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Thomistic Principles and Bioethics

Routledge (2006)

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  1. Creating Non-Human Persons: Might It Be Worth the Risk?Jason T. Eberl - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):52 – 54.
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  • Reinterpreting the 'Quickening' Perspective in the Abortion Debate.Farrokh B. Sekaleshfar - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (2):161-171.
    Personhood constitutes the pivotal point in the abortion debate. There exists a diversity of views as to when foetal personhood actually starts—from conception and implantation to viability and even birth. One perspective that has lost support for decades is that of quickening, a stance associated with Lord Ellenborough’s 1803 Act. This paper attempts to put quickening back into the limelight, albeit through a new interpretation. After discussing its philosophy and underpinning rationale, I will assess a number of arguments that have (...)
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  • A Thomistic Appraisal of Human Enhancement Technologies.Jason T. Eberl - 2014 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (4):289-310.
    Debate concerning human enhancement often revolves around the question of whether there is a common “nature” that all human beings share and which is unwarrantedly violated by enhancing one’s capabilities beyond the “species-typical” norm. I explicate Thomas Aquinas’s influential theory of human nature, noting certain key traits commonly shared among human beings that define each as a “person” who possesses inviolable moral status. Understanding the specific qualities that define the nature of human persons, which includes self-conscious awareness, capacity for intellective (...)
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  • Ontological Classifications and Human Rationality in Bioethics.Alexandra T. Romanyshyn - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (4):391-402.
    Metaphysics often has an important role in deciding ethical questions. Specifically, in the realm of bioethics, metaphysical questions such as the nature of persons, diseases, and properties in general can be crucial to determining what is right or wrong. In this article, I tie together various metaphysical themes that recur throughout the rest of the issue: rationality as an element of human nature, ontological classifications, and kinds of action. I will explain that each has ethical implications. Actions that contravene reason (...)
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  • Mandatory Autopsies and Organ Conscription.David Hershenov - 2009 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (4):367-391.
    The State may require an autopsy when foul play is suspected in the death of one of its citizens.[1] This is so regardless of any objections to such invasive procedures expressed by the deceased before their deaths or afterward by their families. There is not even a religious exemption. The most obvious explanation for why consent is not needed is that apprehending a murderer with information obtained from the autopsy can save lives. However, taking organs without consent from the deceased (...)
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  • Throwing the Baby Out with the Bathwater? Moral Status and Rights-Based Moral Obligations.Janet Malek - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):46 – 47.
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  • The Moral Status of 'Unborn Children' Without Rights.Jason T. Eberl - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):44 – 46.
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  • Brain Death, Souls, and Integrated Functioning: Reply to Verheijde and Potts.Stephen Napier - 2013 - Christian Bioethics 19 (1):25-39.
    Recently, Verheijde and Potts (2011) have called into question the whole-brain death (WBD) criterion and, in particular, have taken issue with my admittedly limited defense of WBD. I would like to thank Verheijde and Potts for their comments and for identifying key points in the debate that need further clarification and defense. This article is an attempt to provide such clarification and to focus on Verheijde and Potts’s key argument against me and other proponents of WBD. The structure of this (...)
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  • Advancing the Case for Organ Procurement.Jason T. Eberl - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):22-23.
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  • Pregnancy Is Not a Crime.Lauren Sydney Flicker - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):54-55.
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  • Fetuses Are Neither Violinists nor Violators.Jason T. Eberl - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):53-54.
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  • The Complex Nature of Jewish and Catholic Bioethics.Jason T. Eberl - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (11):31-32.
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  • Review of John P. Lizza. Persons, Humanity, and the Definition of Death.1. [REVIEW]Jason T. Eberl - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (3):55-57.
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  • Exercising Restraint in the Creation of Animal–Human Chimeras.Jason T. Eberl & Rebecca A. Ballard - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (6):45 – 46.
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