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  1. Obesity, Political Responsibility, and the Politics of Needs.Kaja Tulatz - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (2):305-315.
    Since overweight and obesity have been framed as one of the main contemporary health challenges in industrialized countries, it has become a matter of public health efforts. While the belief that obese individuals are personally responsible for their body weight prevails in public opinion, evidence-based health science widely acknowledges that obesity is significantly influenced by socio-economic factors and thus that prevention requires structural changes. This constellation bears the chance of politicizing an issue formerly conceived of as private which really is (...)
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  • Eating Identities, “Unhealthy” Eaters, and Damaged Agency.Megan Dean - 2018 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 4 (3).
    This paper argues that common social narratives about unhealthy eaters can cause significant damage to agency. I identify and analyze a narrative that combines a “control model” of eating agency with the healthist assumption that health is the ultimate end of eating. I argue that this narrative produces and enables four types of damage to the agency of those identified as unhealthy eaters. Due to uncertainty about what counts as healthy eating and various forms of prejudice, the unhealthy eater label (...)
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  • Why We Never Eat Alone: The Overlooked Role of Microbes and Partners in Obesity Debates in Bioethics.Nicolae Morar & Joshua August Skorburg - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (3):435-448.
    Debates about obesity in bioethics tend to unfold in predictable epicycles between individual choices and behaviours and the oppressive socio-economic structures constraining them. Here, we argue that recent work from two cutting-edge research programmes in microbiology and social psychology can advance this conceptual stalemate in the literature. We begin in section 1 by discussing two promising lines of obesity research involving the human microbiome and relationship partners. Then, in section 2, we show how this research has made viable novel strategies (...)
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