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  1. Reply to Commentaries on ‘The Labour Theory of Property and Marginal Productivity Theory’.David Ellerman - 2016 - Economic Thought 5 (2):44.
    Jamie Morgan's commentary on my paper 'The Labour Theory of Property and Marginal Productivity Theory' and Ted Burczak's later comments raise a number of issues that surely will occur to other readers and that need to be addressed. I take the occasion to expand upon the arguments and to explore some related issues. In the narrative that unfolds, Frank H. Knight plays the role of the sophisticated defender of the system of renting, hiring and employing human beings. He was quite (...)
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  • Power, Property, the Law, and the Corporation – a Commentary on David Ellerman's Paper: 'The Labour Theory of Property and Marginal Productivity Theory'.Jamie Morgan - 2016 - Economic Thought 5 (1):37.
    The point of departure of David Ellerman's paper is that the role of labour in economics can be looked at in a fundamentally different way than has typically been the case. The paper's purpose is, therefore, oppositional. However, it cannot simply be dismissed. It is clearly articulated, well reasoned, and most importantly, thought provoking. It requires one to rethink how one conceives some basic issues in economics. As such, one does not need to be entirely convinced by the argument to (...)
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  • On the Labor Theory of Property: Is The Problem Distribution or Predistribution?David Ellerman - unknown
    Much of the recent discussion in progressive circles [e.g., Stiglitz; Galbraith; Piketty] has focused the obscene mal-distribution of wealth and income as if that was "the" problem in our economic system. And the proposed redistributive reforms have all stuck to that framing of the question. To put the question in historical perspective, one might note that there was a similar, if not more extreme, mal-distribution of wealth, income, and political power in the Antebellum system of slavery. Yet, it should be (...)
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