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  1. Catharsis and Moral Therapy I: A Platonic Account.Jan Helge Solbakk - 2005 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (1):57-67.
    This paper aims at analysing the ancient Greek notions of catharsis (clearing up, cleaning), to holon (the whole) and therapeia (therapy, treatment, healing) to assess whether they may be of help in addressing a set of questions concerning the didactics of medical ethics: What do medical students actually experience and learn when they attend classes of medical ethics? How should teachers of medical ethics proceed didactically to make students benefit morally from their teaching? And finally, to what extent and in (...)
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  • Edward N. O'Neil.: Teles (The Cynic Teacher). (Society of Biblical Literature, Texts and Translations Number 11, Graeco-Roman Religion No. 3.) Pp. Xxv + 97. Missoula, Montana: Scholars Press, 1977. Paper. [REVIEW]John Glucker - 1980 - The Classical Review 30 (01):150-151.
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  • Education as a Moral Practice.Richard Pring - 2001 - Journal of Moral Education 30 (2):101-112.
    The interest in moral education has focused largely on the teaching of morality or on nurturing moral qualities and virtues or on the "moral atmosphere" of the school; but little, comparatively speaking, has been written about education itself as essentially a moral practice. Failure, in this respect, has damaging results. First, the practice of education goes adrift from its moral roots ? and serves particular ends such as economic well-being or citizenship as conceived by those in power. Secondly, the programmes (...)
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  • Attic Comedy and the 'Comic Angels' Krater in New York.H. Alan Shapiro - 1995 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 115:173-175.
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  • Catharsis and Moral Therapy I: A Platonic Account. [REVIEW]Jan Helge Solbakk - 2005 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (2):141-153.
    This article aims at analysing Aristotle’s poetic conception of catharsis to assess whether it may be of help in enlightening the particular didactic challenges involved when training medical students to cope morally with complex or tragic situations of medical decision-making. A further aim of this investigation is to show that Aristotle’s criteria for distinguishing between history and tragedy may be employed to reshape authentic stories of sickness into tragic stories of sickness. Furthermore, the didactic potentials of tragic stories of sickness (...)
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  • Danto y la mímesis: más allá del fin del arte.Mariana Castillo Merlo - 2015 - Páginas de Filosofía (Universidad Nacional del Comahue) 16 (19):114-133.
    En Después del fin del arte, Danto se refiere a la mímesis como un estilo artístico y como la respuesta filosófica a la pregunta acerca de qué es el arte. En el panorama del arte contemporáneo, la mímesis se habría agotado y no tendría ningún papel activo que cumplir. El objetivo de mi trabajo será mostrar cómo Danto construye un relato legitimador en torno a la mímesis que le permite justificar su tesis sobre el fin del arte. Luego, señalaré los (...)
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  • Aristotle's Definition of Anagnorisis.John MacFarlane - 2000 - American Journal of Philology 121 (3):367-383.
    I argue for a new construal of Aristotle’s definition of anagnorisis (recognition) in Poetics 11. Virtually all translators and interpreters of the definition have understood the phrase ton pros eutuchian e dustuchian horismenon as a subjective genitive characterizing the persons involved in the recognition. I argue that it should instead be taken as a partitive genitive characterizing the genus of changes (metabolon) of which recognitions are a species. In addition to being preferable on philogical grounds, the construal I recommend helps (...)
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  • Pleasure, Tragedy and Aristotelian Psychology.Elizabeth Belfiore - 1985 - Classical Quarterly 35 (2):349-361.
    Aristotle's Rhetoric defines fear as a kind of pain or disturbance and pity as a kind of pain. In his Poetics, however, pity and fear are associated with pleasure: ‘ The poet must provide the pleasure that comes from pity and fear by means of imitation’. The question of the relationship between pleasure and pain in Aristotle's aesthetics has been studied primarily in connection with catharsis. Catharsis, however, raises more problems than it solves. Aristotle says nothing at all about the (...)
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  • Mímesis y máthesis: acerca de sus conexiones en la Poética de Aristóteles.Mariana Castillo Merlo - 2016 - Dianoia 61 (77):53-81.
    Resumen: El objetivo de este artículo es mostrar la relevancia de la máthesis para la concepción de la mimesis aristotélica. A partir de las observaciones de la Poética, delimitaré las características del aprendizaje tomando como eje su objeto, modalidad y consecuencias. Para ello analizaré, en primer lugar, el objeto sobre el que recae el aprendizaje mimético, esto es, los hombres que actúan. Luego examinaré la modalidad de presentación de sus acciones para que sea posible el aprendizaje, prestando especial atención al (...)
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  • Emociones cómicas: El Tractatus Coislinianus a la luz de la poética aristofánica.Claudia N. Fernández - 2006 - Circe de Clásicos y Modernos 10:137-156.
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