Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Human Rights and Global Health: A Research Program.Thomas W. Pogge - 2005 - Metaphilosophy 36 (1‐2):182-209.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   52 citations  
  • The Right to Know and the Right Not to Tell: The Ethics of Disclosure of HIV Status.Mary O'Grady - 2011 - Postmodern Openings 2 (6):77-167.
    some 20 years. Yet the ethical issues surrounding the disclosure of positive HIV status have not been examined comprehensively. This report examines the ethics behind the disclosure of HIV-positive status primarily or individuals to their sex partners, and for health care practitioners to a patient’s sex partner when the patient is unwilling to disclose. Relevant rights and ethical principles are analysed, including the rights to: self-preservation; privacy and confidentiality; and the bioethical principles of respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Global Health Law, Ethics, and Policy.Lawrence O. Gostin & James G. Hodge - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):519-525.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Global Health Law, Ethics, and Policy.Lawrence O. Gostin & James G. Hodge - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):519-525.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Addressing the Global Tragedy of Needless Pain: Rethinking the United Nations Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs.Allyn L. Taylor - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):556-570.
    Important medical advances over the last several decades have vastly improved the technical capacity to control human pain. Millions of patients suffering from cancer, HIV/AIDS, and other conditions have been able to find relief from incapacitating chronic and acute pain. However, despite these developments, pain remains severely under treated worldwide, particularly in developing countries. The tragic consequence is that for millions of people around the globe, excruciating pain is an inescapable reality of life.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Addressing the Global Tragedy of Needless Pain: Rethinking the United Nations Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs.Allyn L. Taylor - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):556-570.
    The lack of medical availability of effective pain medication is an enduring and expanding global health calamity. Despite important medical advances, pain remains severely under-treated worldwide, particularly in developing countries. This article contributes to the discussion of this global health crisis by considering international legal and institutional mechanisms to promote wider accessibility to critical narcotic drugs for pain relief.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • “Life Begins When They Steal Your Bicycle”: Cross-Cultural Practices of Personhood at the Beginnings and Ends of Life.Lynn M. Morgan - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):8-15.
    A friend once told me I was wasting my time writing about cross-cultural perspectives on the beginnings of life. “Your work is interesting for its curiosity value,” he said, “but fundamentally worthless. What happens in other cultures is totally irrelevant to what is happening here.” Those were discouraging words, but as I followed the American debates about the beginnings and ends of life, it seemed he was right. Anthropologists have written a great deal about birth and death rites in other (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • “Life Begins When They Steal Your Bicycle”: Cross-Cultural Practices of Personhood at the Beginnings and Ends of Life.Lynn M. Morgan - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):8-15.
    This paper examines two reasons anthropological expertise has recently come to be considered relevant to American debates about the beginnings and ends of life. First, bioethicists and clinicians working to accommodate diverse perspectives into clinical decision-making have come to appreciate the importance of culture. Second, anthropologists are the recognized authorities on the cultural logic and behaviors of the “Other.” Yet the definitions of culture with which bioethicists and clinicians operate may differ from those used by contemporary anthropologists, who view culture (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Rescuing Critique.Joseph D. Lewandowski - 2008 - Theory, Culture and Society 25 (7-8):285-308.
    This article explores the work of the contemporary sociologist and urban photographer, Camilo Vergara. The piece draws on early work in critical theory to characterize Vergara's work as `rescuing critique'. Specifically, the article maintains that it is only in the theoretical vocabulary of Walter Benjamin that the methodological uniqueness, historical sensitivity and critical thrust of Vergara's project can be adequately understood. Indeed, it is argued that what is truly distinct about Vergara's work is the decidedly Benjaminian way in which, in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Schopenhauer and the Malaise of an Age.Jordi Cabos - 2016 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 42 (1):93-113.
    Although suffering in Schopenhauer’s works may be explained by how the will to life is objectified in the world, a more precise inquiry leads us to elucidate the significance of this experience in his writings. This article claims in the first place that suffering in this author’s works is triggered by multiple sources and takes various forms. In fact, and this is the article’s second claim, these sources coincide with some later scholars’ characterizations of modern suffering. The main aim is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Nurses, Industrial Action and Ethics: Considerations From the 2010 South African Public-Sector Strike.André J. Van Rensburg & Dingie Janse van Rensburg - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (7):0969733012473771.
    Several important ethical dilemmas emerge when nurses join a public-sector strike. Such industrial action is commonplace in South Africa and was most notably illustrated by a national wage negotiation in 2010. Media coverage of the proceedings suggested unethical behaviour on the part of nurses, and further exploration is merited. Laws, policies and provisional codes are meant to guide nurses’ behaviour during industrial action, while ethical theories can be used to further illuminate the role of nurses in industrial action. There are, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Health and Human Rights Advocacy: Perspectives From a Rwandan Refugee Camp.C. Pavlish, A. Ho & A. -M. Rounkle - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (4):538-549.
    Working at the bedside and within communities as patient advocates, nurses frequently intervene to advance individuals’ health and well-being. However, the International Council of Nurses’ Code of Ethics asserts that nurses should expand beyond the individual model and also promote a rights-enabling environment where respect for human dignity is paramount. This article applies the results of an ethnographic human rights study with displaced populations in Rwanda to argue for a rights-based social advocacy role for nurses. Human rights advocacy strategies include (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • From Anticipatory Corpse to Posthuman God.Jeffrey P. Bishop - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (6):679-695.
    The essays in this issue of JMP are devoted to critical engagement of my book, The Anticipatory Corpse. The essays, for the most part, accept the main thrust of my critique of medicine. The main thrust of the criticism is whether the scope of the critique is too totalizing, and whether the proposed remedy is sufficient. I greatly appreciate these interventions because they allow me this occasion to respond and clarify, and to even further extend the argument of my book. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Domination and Destitution in an Unjust World.Ryoa Chung - 2005 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 35 (sup1):311-334.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ethics and Infectious Disease.Michael J. Selgelid - 2005 - Bioethics 19 (3):272–289.
    This seminal collection on the ethical issues associated with infectious disease is the first book to correct bioethics’ glaring neglect of this subject. Timely in view of public concern about SARS, AIDS, avian flu, bioterrorism and antibiotic resistance. Brings together new and classic papers by prominent figures. Tackles the ethical issues associated with issues such as quarantine, vaccination policy, pandemic planning, biodefense, wildlife disease and health care in developing countries.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  • Social Structure and Nursing Research.Stuart Nairn - 2009 - Nursing Philosophy 10 (3):191-202.
    The concept of social structure is ill defined in the literature despite the perennial problem and ongoing discussion about the relationship between agency and structure. In this paper I will provide an outline of what the term social structure means, but my main focus will be on emphasizing the value of the concept for nursing research and demonstrate how its erasure in some research negatively effects on our understanding of the nurses' role in clinical practice. For example, qualitative research in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Our Common Enemy: Combatting the World's Deadliest Viruses to Ensure Equity Health Care in Developing Nations.John J. Carvalho - 2009 - Zygon 44 (1):51-63.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Our Common Enemy: Combatting the World's Deadliest Viruses to Ensure Equity Health Care in Developing Nations.I. V. Carvalho - 2009 - Zygon 44 (1):51-63.
    In a previous issue of Zygon (Carvalho 2007), I explored the role of scientists—especially those engaging the science-religion dialogue—within the arena of global equity health, world poverty, and human rights. I contended that experimental biologists, who might have reduced agency because of their professional workload or lack of individual resources, can still unite into collective forces with other scientists as well as human rights organizations, medical doctors, and political and civic leaders to foster progressive change in our world. In this (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Structural Violence, Intersectionality, and Justpeace: Evaluating Women's Peacebuilding Agency in Manipur, India.Karie Cross Riddle - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (3):574-592.
    The general scholarship on armed conflict in Manipur, India, ignores the experiences of women as agents. Feminist scholarship counters this tendency, revealing women's everyday responses to the violence that constrains them. However, this scholarship often fails to be intersectional, and it lauds every instance of women's agency without evaluating it in terms of its ability to build peace. Employing Kimberlé Crenshaw's underused distinction between structural and political intersectionality and Saba Mahmood's concept of agency, I analyze my field research conducted with (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Structural Health Vulnerability: Health Inequalities, Structural and Epistemic Injustice.Ryoa Chung - 2021 - Journal of Social Philosophy 52 (2):201-216.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Fair Trade: Global Problems and Individual Responsibilities.Sarah C. Goff - 2018 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 21 (4):521-543.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Scientist as Statesman: Biologists and Third World Health.John J. Carvalho - 2007 - Zygon 42 (2):289-300.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Ethics, Tuberculosis and Globalization.Michael J. Selgelid - 2008 - Public Health Ethics 1 (1):10-20.
    CAPPE LPO Box 8260 ANU Canberra ACT 2601 Australia Tel: +61 (0)2 6125 4355, Fax: +61 (0)2 6125 6579; Email: michael.selgelid{at}anu.edu.au ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract This article reviews ethically relevant history of tuberculosis and recent developments regarding extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB). It argues that tuberculosis is one of the most important neglected topics in bioethics. With an emphasis on XDR-TB, it examines a range of the more challenging ethical issues associated with tuberculosis: (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Ubuntu and Freedom of Expression: Considering Children and Broadcast News Violence in a Violent Society.Colin Chasi - 2015 - Journal of Media Ethics 30 (2):91-108.
    Ubuntu has been described as an African moral philosophy that finds actions grounded on good will to be right if they promote shared identity. I contend that freedom of expression is consistent with ubuntu. Freedom of expression enables people to be the most they can be, enabling the establishment of communities in which people can live together harmoniously. With reference to the violent South African society, the study examines broadcast media violence that may harm children to draw new insights concerning (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ethnography and Jewish Ethics.Michal S. Raucher - 2016 - Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (4):636-658.
    This essay offers a Jewish approach to ethnography in religious ethics. Following the work of other ethnographers working in religious ethics, I explore how an ethnographic account of reproductive ethics among Haredi Jewish women in Jerusalem enhances and improves Jewish ethical discourse. I argue that ethnography should become an integral part of Jewish ethics for three reasons. First, with a contextual approach to guidance and application of law and norms, an ethnographic approach to Jewish ethics parallels the way ethical decisions (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Why Does Cuba 'Care' So Much? Understanding the Epistemology of Solidarity in Global Health Outreach.Robert Huish - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (3):261-276.
    Cuba currently has more than 38,000 health workers providing emergency relief, long-term community-based care and medical education to some of the most vulnerable communities in the world. This current outreach to 76 countries positions Cuba as a leader in global health outreach. This has been well documented and praised by many scholars and policy makers alike. While many acknowledge the importance and impact of the Cuba’s global effort, there is very little understanding as to why Cuba makes such a large (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Expressive Function of Public Health Policy: The Case of Pandemic Planning.R. Pierce - 2011 - Public Health Ethics 4 (1):53-62.
    Many legal scholars well recognize that, in some instances, support for a law or policy may be primarily because of its expressive function, i.e. the statements it makes about underlying values. In these cases, the expressive content of a law or policy may actually overshadow its central purpose. Examples of this phenomenon, according to Cass Sunstein, include, for example, regulations against hate speech in the USA. He suggests that achieving the consequence (prohibiting hateful speech against certain groups) may not be (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • A Theoretical Framework for a Comprehensive Approach to Medical Humanitarianism.R. Chung - 2012 - Public Health Ethics 5 (1):49-55.
    This article aims to demonstrate how the impact of humanitarian crises on health outcomes is related to social justice issues, even when these crises are brought upon by natural disasters. Pre-existing inequalities between individuals and social groups within a community affect in important and complex ways the health disparities which result from natural disasters. Drawing on the thought-provoking work of Paul Farmer, my main hypothesis is that socio-political factors prior to natural disasters determine ‘structured health risks’ that humanitarian crises will (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Three Proposals for Rewarding Novel Health Technologies Benefiting People Living in Poverty. A Comparative Analysis of Prize Funds, Health Impact Funds and a Cost-Effectiveness/Competitive Tender Treaty.Thomas Alured Faunce & Hitoshi Nasu - 2008 - Public Health Ethics 1 (2):146-153.
    Thomas Alured Faunce, College of Law, Fellows Road, Acton, Canberra ACT 0200, Australian National University, Fax: 61 2 61253971, Email: Thomas.Faunce{at}anu.edu.au ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//-->This paper sets out to analyse three different academic proposals for addressing the needs of the poor in relation to new, rather than ‘essential’ medicines. It focuses particularly on research and development prize funds, a health impact fund system and a multilateral treaty on health technology cost-effectiveness evaluation and competitive tender. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • In Support of a Broad Model of Public Health: Disparities, Social Epidemiology and Public Health Causation.Daniel S. Goldberg - 2009 - Public Health Ethics 2 (1):70-83.
    Corresponding Author, Health Policy & Ethics Fellow, Chronic Disease Prevention & Control Research Center, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, 1709 Dryden, Suite 1025, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Tel.: 713.798.5482; Fax: 713 798 3990; Email: danielg{at}bcm.edu ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> . Abstract This article defends a broad model of public health, one that specifically addresses the social epidemiologic research suggesting that social conditions are primary determinants of health. The article proceeds by critiquing one (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Suffering Peacefully: Experiences of Infancy Death in Contemporary Zambia.Sesilie Smørholm - 2016 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 44 (3):333-351.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Climate Change and Structural Emissions: Moral Obligations at the Individual Level.Monica Aufrecht - 2011 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2):201-213.
    Given that mitigating climate change is a large-scale global issue, what obligations do individuals have to lower their personal carbon emissions? I survey recent suggestions by Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and Dale Jamieson and offer models for thinking about their respective approaches. I then present a third model based on the notion of structural violence. While the three models are not mutually incompatible, each one suggests a different focus for mitigating climate change. In the end, I agree with Sinnott-Armstrong that people have (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Morality of Performance: HIV Disclosure in Speech and Song in South Africa.Steven P. Black - 2015 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 43 (3):247-266.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Medicine's Perception of Reality - a Split Picture: Critical Reflections on Apparent Anomalies Within the Biomedical Theory of Science.Anna Luise Kirkengen, Tor-Johan Ekeland, Linn Getz, Irene Hetlevik, Edvin Schei, Elling Ulvestad & Arne Johan Vetlesen - 2016 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 22 (4):496-501.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Quantified Self: Closing the Gap Between General Knowledge and Particular Case?Eline Thornquist & Anna Luise Kirkengen - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (3):398-403.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Lived Body as a Medical Topic: An Argument for an Ethically Informed Epistemology.Anna Luise Kirkengen & Eline Thornquist - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1095-1101.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • ‘Better Than Nothing’ is Not Good Enough: Challenges to Introducing Evidence-Based Approaches for Traumatized Populations.James J. Clark, Ginny Sprang, Benjamin Freer & Adrienne Whitt-Woosley - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):352-359.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Beyond Biomedicine: Health Through Social and Cultural Understanding.Iccha Basnyat - 2011 - Nursing Inquiry 18 (2):123-134.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Food and Medicine: A Biosemiotic Perspective.Yogi Hale Hendlin & Jonathan Hope (eds.) - 2021 - Berlin: Springer Nature.
    This edited volume provides a biosemiotic analysis of the ecological relationship between food and medicine. Drawing on the origins of semiotics in medicine, this collection proposes innovative ways of considering aliments and treatments. Considering the ever-evolving character of our understanding of meaning-making in biology, and considering the keen popular interest in issues relating to food and medicines - fueled by an increasing body of interdisciplinary knowledge - the contributions here provide diverse insights and arguments into the larger ecology of organisms’ (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Prioritarian Principles for Digital Health in Low Resource Settings.Niall Winters, Sridhar Venkatapuram, Anne Geniets & Emma Wynne-Bannister - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (4):259-264.
    This theoretical paper argues for prioritarianism as an ethical underpinning for digital health in contexts of extreme disadvantage. In support of this claim, the paper develops three prioritarian principles for making ethical decisions for digital health programme design, grounded in the normative position that the greater the need, the stronger the moral claim. The principles are positioned as an alternative view to the prevailing utilitarian approach to digital health, which the paper argues is not sufficient to address the needs of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Cross-Border Feminism: Shifting the Terms of Debate for Us and European Feminists.Shari Stone-Mediatore - 2009 - Journal of Global Ethics 5 (1):57 – 71.
    Recent decades of women's rights advocacy have produced numerous regional and international agreements for protecting women's security, including a UN convention that affirms the state's responsibility to protect key gender-specific rights, with no exceptions on the basis of culture or religion. At the same time, however, the focus on universal women's rights has enabled influential feminists in the United States to view women's rights in opposition to culture, and most often in opposition to other people's cultures. Not surprisingly, then, feminists (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Exporting the Culture of Life.Laura Purdy - 2008 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), International Public Health Policy & Ethics. Dordrecht. pp. 91--106.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Human Rights and Global Mental Health: Reducing the Use of Coercive Measures.Kelso Cratsley, Marisha Wickremsinhe & Timothy K. Mackey - 2021 - In A. Dyer, B. Kohrt & P. J. Candilis (eds.), Global Mental Health Ethics. Springer. pp. 247-268.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Access to Antiretroviral Treatment, Issues of Well-Being and Public Health Governance in Chad: What Justifies the Limited Success of the Universal Access Policy?Jacquineau Azétsop & Blondin A. Diop - 2013 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8:8.
    Universal access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Chad was officially declared in December 2006. This presidential initiative was and is still funded 100% by the country’s budget and external donors’ financial support. Many factors have triggered the spread of AIDS. Some of these factors include the existence of norms and beliefs that create or increase exposure, the low-level education that precludes access to health information, social unrest, and population migration to areas of high economic opportunities and gender-based discrimination. Social forces (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Psychic vulnerability and migratory processes. Some considerations on the sidelines of a research-intervention project.Carlo Orefice - 2021 - ENCYCLOPAIDEIA 25 (59):97-108.
    This article reflects on the value of training of health care professionals that find themselves in variously changing and complex settings, and who find themselves interacting with themes, problems and practices related to mental health. Starting from some reflections that emerged with operators involved in a professional training course within a specific research-intervention project, the contribution questions how a renewed “pedagogy of care” can help these professionals to better understand the nature and the constitutive factors of the process of signification (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • When International Humanitarian or Medical Missions Go Wrong: An Ethical Analysis.David Zientek & Ric Bonnell - 2020 - HEC Forum 32 (4):333-343.
    Recent decades have seen a significant increase in physicians participating in international short-term missions to regions with limited or no access to health care by virtue of natural disaster or lack of resources. Recent publications in the ethics literature have explored the potential of these missions for unintentional harm to the intended beneficiaries. Less has been discussed about how to respond when harm actually occurs. The authors review the ethical issues raised by short-term medical and humanitarian missions and the literature (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Impact of Economic Globalisation on Health.Meri Koivusalo - 2005 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (1):13-34.
    The analysis of the impact of economic globalisation on health depends on how it is defined and should consider how it shapes both health and health policies. I first discuss the ways in which economic globalisation can and has been defined and then why it is important to analyse its impact both in terms of health and health policies. I then explore the ways in which economic globalisation influences health and health policies and how this relates to equity, social justice, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Using chiles and comics to address the physical and emotional wellbeing of farmworkers in Vermont’s borderlands.Teresa Mares, Naomi Wolcott-MacCausland, Julia Doucet, Andy Kolovos & Marek Bennett - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):197-208.
    In Vermont, approximately 1000–1200 migrant workers from Latin America are helping to sustain the state’s dairy industry. These dairy workers, the majority of whom are from Mexico and Guatemala, experience significant mental health impacts stemming from a combination of stressors due to leaving their home of origin and challenges related to working in rural Vermont. This article employs a framework of structural violence and structural vulnerability to situate the lived experiences and health concerns of migrant farmworkers in Vermont’s dairy industry. (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Pregnant Woman Versus Mosquito: A Feminist Epidemiology of Zika Virus.Candace Johnson - 2017 - Journal of International Political Theory 13 (2):233-250.
    This article investigates the contradictions between public health protocols and infection containment efforts concerning Zika virus and reproductive rights. In El Salvador, for example, women are being advised to avoid pregnancy until 2018, at which time local authorities hope that the virus will be under control. This is not so easy, however, as there is limited access to contraception, abortion is illegal in all instances, and women tend to have little household authority. In this article, I examine the policy, legal, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • On the Emergence of Science and Justice.Jenny Reardon - 2013 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 38 (2):176-200.
    In the last few years, justice has emerged as a matter of concern for the contemporary constitution of technoscience. Increasingly, both practicing scientists and engineers and scholars of science and technology cite justice as an organizing theme of their work. In this essay, I consider why “science and justice” might be arising now. I then ask after the opportunities, but also the dangers, of this formation. By way of example, I explore the openings and exclusions created by the recent conjugation (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations