Switch to: References

Citations of:

Agency and Inner Freedom

Noûs 51 (1):3-23 (2017)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Autonomy and Responsibility.Lubomira V. Radoilska - forthcoming - In Ben Colburn (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Autonomy.
    This chapter offers a fine-grained analysis of the relationship between autonomy and responsibility in order to address a challenge according to which considering autonomy and responsibility as closely related is misleading since these concepts serve different normative objectives. In response to this challenge, I first explore two criteria of ascription – rationality and control – that autonomy and responsibility seem to share. I then contrast and compare three pairs of autonomy and responsibility conceptions. Examining these pairs rescues the idea that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Unity and Disunity in the Positive Tradition.Michael Garnett - 2022 - In John Christman (ed.), Positive Freedom: Past, Present, and Future. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 8-27.
    What is 'positive freedom'? Whereas negative freedom may be characterised as an absence of coercion or physical prevention, and republican freedom as an absence of interpersonal domination, positive freedom resists such pithy treatment. The term is widely taken to refer to a variety of seemingly distinct goods, including but not limited to actually exercisable options or capabilities, collective self-determination, psychological self-government, and self-realisation or flourishing. In this paper I aim to bring the positive conception into better focus by tracing the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Free and Always Will Be? On Social Media Participation as It Undermines Individual Autonomy.Kathryn J. Norlock - 2021 - Canadian Journal of Practical Philosophy 5 (1):52-65.
    Open Access: Social media participation undermines individual autonomy in ways that ought to concern ethicists. Discussions in the philosophical literature are concerned primarily with egregious conduct online such as harassment and shaming, keeping the focus on obvious ills to which no one could consent; this prevents a wider understanding of the risks and harms of quotidian social media participation. Two particular concerns occupy me: social media participation carries the risks of (1) negatively formative experiences and (2) continuous partial attention due (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark