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Between Philosophy and Art

In Taylor Carman (ed.), Cambridge Companion to Merleau Ponty. Cambridge University Press (2004)

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  1. Recasting Objective Thought : The Venture of Expression in Merleau-Ponty’s Philosophy.Anna Petronella Foultier - 2015 - Dissertation, Stockholm University
    This thesis is about meaning, expression and language in Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy, and their role in the phenomenological project as a whole. For Merleau-Ponty, expression is the taking up of a meaning given either in perception or in already acquired forms of expression, thereby repeating, transforming or congealing meaning into gestures, utterances, artworks, ideas or theories. Contrary to the predominant view in the literature, the relation of expression to meaning, and in particular the problem of expressing new meanings, was of fundamental (...)
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  • Ontology and Painting, Or: Merleau-Ponty’s Eye and Mind and its Relation to the Ocular.Clark Ross - unknown
    In this paper I put forward an argument concerning the place and significance of painting in Merleau-Ponty’s famous last essay Eye and Mind. I argue that for Merleau-Ponty modern philosophy comes about through an engagement with vision – in an attempt to think its peculiar virtue of “action at a distance” – but ends up betraying this dynamic, by offering us an account of vision that is grounded in the spontaneity of the mind. In this sense I claim that Eye (...)
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  • “The First Man Speaking”: Merleau-Ponty on Expression as the Task of Phenomenology.Anna Petronella Foultier - 2015 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 46 (3):195-212.
    This article aims to establish an understanding of Merleau-Ponty's view of creative expression, and of its phenomenological function, setting out from the intriguing statement in his essay “Cézanne's Doubt” that the painter finds himself in the situation of the first human being trying to express herself. Although the importance of primary or creative expression in Merleau-Ponty's philosophy is well known, there is no consensus among commentators with respect to how this notion is to be understood, and of its apparently paradoxical (...)
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