Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. A Neurophysiological Dissociation Between Monitoring One’s Own and Others’ Actions in Psychopathy.Inti A. Brazil, Rogier B. Mars, Berend H. Bulten, Jan K. Buitelaar, Robbert J. Verkes & Ellen R. A. De Bruijn - 2011 - Biological Psychiatry 69:693–699.
    Monitoring of own behavior is not affected in psychopathy, whereas processing of the outcome of others’ actions is disturbed. Specifically, although psychopathic individuals do not have a problem with initial processing of the actions of others, they have problems with deeper analyses of the consequences of the observed action, possibility related to the reward value of the action. These results suggest that aspects of action monitoring in psychopathy are disturbed in social contexts and possibly play a central role in the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Neural Correlates of Error-Related Learning Deficits in Individuals with Psychopathy.A. K. L. von Borries, Inti A. Brazil, B. H. Bulten, J. K. Buitelaar, R. J. Verkes & E. R. A. de Bruijn - 2010 - Psychological Medicine 40:1559–1568.
    The results are interpreted in terms of a deficit in initial rule learning and subsequent generalization of these rules to new stimuli. Negative feedback is adequately processed at a neural level but this information is not used to improve behaviour on subsequent trials. As learning is degraded, the process of error detection at the moment of the actual response is diminished. Therefore, the current study demonstrates that disturbed error-monitoring processes play a central role in the often reported learning deficits in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Psychopathic Individuals Exhibit but Do Not Avoid Regret During Counterfactual Decision Making.Arielle Baskin-Sommersa, Allison M. Stuppy-Sullivana Allison & Joshua W. Buckholtz - 2016 - Proceedins of the National Academy of Sciences 113 (50):14438-14443.
    Psychopathy is associated with persistent antisocial behavior and a striking lack of regret for the consequences of that behavior. Although explanatory models for psychopathy have largely focused on deficits in affective responsiveness, recent work indicates that aberrant value-based decision making may also play a role. On that basis, some have suggested that psychopathic individuals may be unable to effectively use prospective simulations to update action value estimates during cost–benefit decision making. However, the specific mechanisms linking valuation, affective deficits, and maladaptive (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations