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  1. Clown’s View as Respiciō: Looking Respectfully to and After People with Dementia.Ruud Hendriks - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (2):207-217.
    Clowns seem suspect when it comes to respect. The combination of clowning and people with dementia may seem especially suspicious. In this argument, I take potential concerns about clowning in dementia care as an opportunity to explore the meaning of a respectful approach of people with dementia. Our word ‘respect’ is derived from the Latin respiciō, meaning ‘looking back’ or ‘seeing again’, as well as ‘looking after’ or ‘having regard’ for someone or something. I build upon this double meaning of (...)
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  • Advance Directives, Dementia, and Physician-Assisted Death.Paul T. Menzel & Bonnie Steinbock - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (2):484-500.
    Almost all jurisdictions where physician-assisted death is legal require that the requesting individual be competent to make medical decisions at time of assistance. The requirement of contemporary competence is intended to ensure that PAD is limited to people who really want to die and have the cognitive ability to make a final choice of such enormous import. Along with terminal illness, defined as prognosis of death within six months, contemporary competence is regarded as an important safeguard against mistake and abuse, (...)
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  • Advance Directives, Dementia, and Physician‐Assisted Death.Paul T. Menzel & Bonnie Steinbock - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (2):484-500.
    Physician-assisted suicide laws in Oregon and Washington require the person's current competency and a prognosis of terminal illness. In The Netherlands voluntariness and unbearable suffering are required for euthanasia. Many people are more concerned about the loss of autonomy and independence in years of severe dementia than about pain and suffering in their last months. To address this concern, people could write advance directives for physician-assisted death in dementia. Should such directives be implemented even though, at the time, the person (...)
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  • First Prosecution of a Dutch Doctor Since the Euthanasia Act of 2002: What Does the Verdict Mean?Eva Constance Alida Asscher & Suzanne van de Vathorst - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (2):71-75.
    On 11 September 2019, the verdict was read in the first prosecution of a doctor for euthanasia since the Termination of Life on Request and Assisted Suicide Act of 2002 was installed in the Netherlands. The case concerned euthanasia on the basis of an advance euthanasia directive for a patient with severe dementia. In this paper we describe the review process for euthanasia cases in the Netherlands. Then we describe the case in detail, the judgement of the Regional Review Committees (...)
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  • Right Question, But Not Quite the Right Answer: Whether There Is a Third Alternative in Choices About Euthanasia in Alzheimer's Disease.Margaret P. Battin - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):58-60.
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  • An Islamic Perspective on Euthanasia.Kiarash Aramesh & Heydar Shadi - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):65-66.
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  • Euthanasia in Persons with Advanced Dementia: A Dignity-Enhancing Care Approach.Carlos Gómez-Vírseda & Chris Gastmans - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-107308.
    In current Western societies, increasing numbers of people express their desire to choose when to die. Allowing people to choose the moment of their death is an ethical issue that should be embedded in sound clinical and legal frameworks. In the case of persons with dementia, it raises further ethical questions such as: Does the person have the capacity to make the choice? Is the person being coerced? Who should be involved in the decision? Is the person’s suffering untreatable? The (...)
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  • The Implausibility of Response Shifts in Dementia Patients.Karin Rolanda Jongsma, Mirjam A. G. Sprangers & Suzanne van de Vathorst - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (9):597-600.
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  • Dutch Criteria of Due Care for Physician-Assisted Dying in Medical Practice: A Physician Perspective.H. M. Buiting, J. K. M. Gevers, J. A. C. Rietjens, B. D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen, P. J. van der Maas, A. van der Heide & J. J. M. van Delden - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e12-e12.
    Introduction: The Dutch Euthanasia Act states that euthanasia is not punishable if the attending physician acts in accordance with the statutory due care criteria. These criteria hold that: there should be a voluntary and well-considered request, the patient’s suffering should be unbearable and hopeless, the patient should be informed about their situation, there are no reasonable alternatives, an independent physician should be consulted, and the method should be medically and technically appropriate. This study investigates whether physicians experience problems with these (...)
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  • Deliver Us From Evil: Carer Burden in Alzheimer's Disease.Martina Zimmermann - 2010 - Medical Humanities 36 (2):101-107.
    Alzheimer's disease is the most common neurodegenerative disorder in today's developed world that is also increasingly picked out as a focal theme in fictional literature. In dealing with the subjectivity of human experience, such literature enhances the reader's empathy and is able to teach about moral, emotional and philosophical issues, offering the chance to see situations from a position otherwise possibly never taken by the reader. The understanding and insight so gained may well be unscientific, but the literary approach offers (...)
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  • A Plea for End-of-Life Discussions with Patients Suffering From Huntington's Disease: The Role of the Physician.Suzanne J. Booij, Dick P. Engberts, Verena Rödig, Aad Tibben & Raymund A. C. Roos - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (10):621-624.
    Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) by request and/or based on an advance directive are legal in The Netherlands under strict conditions, thus providing options for patients with Huntington's disease (HD) and other neurodegenerative diseases to stay in control and choose their end of life. HD is an inherited progressive disease characterised by chorea and hypokinesia, psychiatric symptoms and dementia. From a qualitative study based on interviews with 15 physicians experienced in treating HD, several ethical issues emerged. Consideration of these aspects (...)
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  • What Makes Suffering "Unbearable and Hopeless"? Advance Directives, Dementia and Disability.Sara Goering - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):62-63.
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  • Beyond a Dworkinean View on Autonomy and Advance Directives in Dementia. Response to Open Peer Commentaries on "Would We Rather Lose Our Life Than Lose Our Self? Lessons From the Dutch Debate on Euthanasia for Patients With Dementia".Cees Hertogh, Marike de Boer, Rose-Marie Dröes & Jan Eefsting - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):4-6.
    This article reviews the Dutch societal debate on euthanasia/assisted suicide in dementia cases, specifically Alzheimer's disease. It discusses the ethical and practical dilemmas created by euthanasia requests in advance directives and the related inconsistencies in the Dutch legal regulations regarding euthanasia/assisted suicide. After an initial focus on euthanasia in advanced dementia, the actual debate concentrates on making euthanasia/assisted suicide possible in the very early stages of dementia. A review of the few known cases of assisted suicide of people with so-called (...)
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  • Conflicting Preferences and Advance Directives.Sandra Woien - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):64-65.
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  • Euthanasia Requests in Dementia Cases; What Are Experiences and Needs of Dutch Physicians? A Qualitative Interview Study.Jaap Schuurmans, Romy Bouwmeester, Lamar Crombach, Tessa van Rijssel, Lizzy Wingens, Kristina Georgieva, Nadine O’Shea, Stephanie Vos, Bram Tilburgs & Yvonne Engels - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-9.
    In the Netherlands, in 2002, euthanasia became a legitimate medical act, only allowed when the due care criteria and procedural requirements are met. Legally, an Advanced Euthanasia Directive can replace direct communication if a patient can no longer express his own wishes. In the past decade, an exponential number of persons with dementia share a euthanasia request with their physician. The impact this on physicians, and the consequent support needs, remained unknown. Our objective was to gain more insight into the (...)
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  • The View From Before.Inez de Beaufort - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):57 – 58.
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  • What If Patients with Dementia Use Decision Aids to Make an Advance Euthanasia Request?Chris Gastmans & Yvonne Denier - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (4):25 – 26.
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  • Help! My Body Is Being Invaded by an Alien!Dena Davis - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):60-61.
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