Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Migration as a Matter of International Concern.Jiewuh Song - 2022 - Res Publica 28 (3):435-444.
    Brock argues that states’ rights of border control should be understood to be conditional on states’ protecting human rights internally as well as on states’ appropriately contributing to the human rights conditions of migrants internationally. I discuss these requirements in turn. I first argue that Brock needs further to specify how internal human rights failures affect the legitimacy of states’ border control rights. I then outline some considerations that I believe would strengthen Brock’s proposal for better international cooperation on migrants’ (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Civil Disobedience.Kimberley Brownlee & Candice Delmas - 2021 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Should We Open Borders? Yes, but Not in the Name of Global Justice.Borja Niño Arnaiz - 2022 - Ethics and Global Politics 15 (2):55-68.
    Some proponents of global justice question that opening borders is an effective strategy to alleviate global poverty and reduce inequalities between countries. This article goes a step further and asks whether an open borders policy is compatible with the objectives of global distributive justice. The latter, it will be argued, entails the ordering of needs, the assignment of priorities and the preference or subordination of some interests over others. In other words, global justice requires the establishment of conditions and restrictions (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Populist Anti-Immigrant Sentiments Taken Seriously: A Realistic Approach.Laura Santi Amantini - 2022 - Res Publica 28 (1):103-123.
    This essay argues that the illiberal anti-immigrant sentiments which lie behind the success of populist right-wing parties deserve the attention of political theorists working on the ethics of migration, even though such sentiments exceed the boundaries of admissible disagreement on justice in migration. Firstly, populist anti-immigrant sentiments hinder the implementation of liberal democratic immigration policies and thus they represent a feasibility constraint for any liberal ethics of migration, not only the most cosmopolitan ones. Secondly, there are legitimacy reasons why such (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Presence and Real Likenesses.John Kulvicki - 2021 - Analysis 81 (3):586-594.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Human Rights and Global Mental Health: Reducing the Use of Coercive Measures.Kelso Cratsley, Marisha Wickremsinhe & Timothy K. Mackey - 2021 - In A. Dyer, B. Kohrt & P. J. Candilis (eds.), Global Mental Health Ethics. Springer. pp. 247-268.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Moving in an Unjust World.Mollie Gerver - 2021 - Analysis 81 (3):577-586.
    Moving is hard. Moving to a new neighbourhood, city or country is difficult without money to buy a bus ticket, money to pay for a visa, or even a passport from a rich country: a citizen in Afghanistan, with a GDP-per-capita of roughly $500 a year, has a close to 0% chance of obtaining any visa to any wealthy country. Wealthy countries fear that those trying to enter from poor countries will try to stay, particularly if fleeing persecution. As a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Counteracting Populist Anti-Immigrant Sentiments: Is Government’s Action Legitimate?Laura Santi Amantini - 2020 - Global Justice : Theory Practice Rhetoric 12 (2):219-244.
    Right-wing populist parties often resort to a xenophobic rhetoric which both exploits and fuels existing illiberal anti-immigrant sentiments. Since populist anti-immigrant sentiments are at odds with fundamental liberal values and challenge the implementation of any liberal ethics of migration, this essay argues that states should adopt civic education policies to counter such sentiments and persuade citizens to develop liberal attitudes towards immigrants. Empirical evidence suggests that sentiments may be malleable, and there are already examples of local governments devising or supporting (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation