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  1. Anthropological and Sociological Critiques of Bioethics.Leigh Turner - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):83-98.
    Anthropologists and sociologists offer numerous critiques of bioethics. Social scientists criticize bioethicists for their arm-chair philosophizing and socially ungrounded pontificating, offering philosophical abstractions in response to particular instances of suffering, making all-encompassing universalistic claims that fail to acknowledge cultural differences, fostering individualism and neglecting the importance of families and communities, and insinuating themselves within the “belly” of biomedicine. Although numerous aspects of bioethics warrant critique and reform, all too frequently social scientists offer ungrounded, exaggerated criticisms of bioethics. Anthropological and sociological (...)
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  • From 'Implications' to 'Dimensions': Science, Medicine and Ethics in Society. [REVIEW]Martyn D. Pickersgill - 2013 - Health Care Analysis 21 (1):31-42.
    Much bioethical scholarship is concerned with the social, legal and philosophical implications of new and emerging science and medicine, as well as with the processes of research that under-gird these innovations. Science and technology studies (STS), and the related and interpenetrating disciplines of anthropology and sociology, have also explored what novel technoscience might imply for society, and how the social is constitutive of scientific knowledge and technological artefacts. More recently, social scientists have interrogated the emergence of ethical issues: they have (...)
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  • Empirical Ethics: A Growing Area of Bioethics.Lucy Frith - 2010 - Clinical Ethics 5 (2):51-53.
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  • Ethnography and Jewish Ethics.Michal S. Raucher - 2016 - Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (4):636-658.
    This essay offers a Jewish approach to ethnography in religious ethics. Following the work of other ethnographers working in religious ethics, I explore how an ethnographic account of reproductive ethics among Haredi Jewish women in Jerusalem enhances and improves Jewish ethical discourse. I argue that ethnography should become an integral part of Jewish ethics for three reasons. First, with a contextual approach to guidance and application of law and norms, an ethnographic approach to Jewish ethics parallels the way ethical decisions (...)
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