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  1. The Near-Failure of Advance Directives: Why They Should Not Be Abandoned Altogether, but Their Role Radically Reconsidered.Marta Spranzi & Véronique Fournier - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (4):563-568.
    Advance directives have been hailed for two decades as the best way to safeguard patients’ autonomy when they are totally or partially incompetent. In many national contexts they are written into law and they are mostly associated with end-of-life decisions. Although advocates and critics of ADs exchange relevant empirical and theoretical arguments, the debate is inconclusive. We argue that this is so for good reasons: the ADs’ project is fraught with tensions, and this is the reason why they are both (...)
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  • Solidarity and Autonomy: Two Conflicting Values in English and French Health Care and Bioethics Debates?Marie Gaille & Ruth Horn - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (6):441-446.
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  • The Role of ‘Accompagnement’ in the End-of-Life Debate in France: From Solidarity to Autonomy.Marie Gaille & Ruth Horn - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (6):473-487.
    This article traces the way autonomy has become a recognised value in health care in France. In a country that based its social fundamentals on the very idea of solidarity for many years, autonomy has long been considered a foreign ‘Anglo-American principle’. Taking the example of the end-of-life debate, the article shows, however, how the use of the French term ‘accompagnement’ allowed autonomy to be redefined and to be associated with the concept of solidarity. Exploring the arguments used over the (...)
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  • Advance Healthcare Directives: Binding or Informational Value?Gianluca Montanari Vergallo - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):98-109.
    :Advance directives entail a refusal expressed by a still-healthy patient. Three consequences stem from that fact: advance refusal is unspecific, since it is impossible to predict what the patient’s conditions and the risk-benefit ratio may be in the foreseeable future; those decisions cannot be as well informed as those formulated while the disease is in progress; while both current consent and refusal can be revoked as the disease unfolds, until the treatment starts out, advance directives become effective when the patient (...)
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  • End-Of-Life Decisions in Chronic Disorders of Consciousness: Sacrality and Dignity as Factors.Rocco Salvatore Calabrò, Antonino Naro, Rosaria De Luca, Margherita Russo, Lory Caccamo, Alfredo Manuli, Bernardo Alagna, Angelo Aliquò & Placido Bramanti - 2016 - Neuroethics 9 (1):85-102.
    The management of patients suffering from chronic disorders of consciousness inevitably raises important ethical questions about the end of life decisions. Some ethical positions claim respect of human life sacredness and the use of good medical practices require allowing DOC patients to live as long as possible, since no one can arbitrarily end either his/her or others’ life. On the other hand, some currents of thought claim respect of human life dignity, patients’ wishes, and the right of free choice entail (...)
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