Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Investigating Trust, Expertise, and Epistemic Injustice in Chronic Pain.Daniel Z. Buchman, Anita Ho & Daniel S. Goldberg - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):31-42.
    Trust is central to the therapeutic relationship, but the epistemic asymmetries between the expert healthcare provider and the patient make the patient, the trustor, vulnerable to the provider, the trustee. The narratives of pain sufferers provide helpful insights into the experience of pain at the juncture of trust, expert knowledge, and the therapeutic relationship. While stories of pain sufferers having their testimonies dismissed are well documented, pain sufferers continue to experience their testimonies as being epistemically downgraded. This kind of epistemic (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • The Weight Attributed to Patient Values in Determining Best Interests.Carolyn Johnston - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):562-564.
    In W v M and Others (Re M) the Court of Protection considered whether withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration was in the best interests of a person in minimally conscious state. The Mental Capacity Act 2005 states that in determining best interests the decision-maker must consider, so far as is reasonably ascertainable, the patient's wishes, feelings, beliefs and values. Baker J. indicated that a high level of specificity is required in order to attribute significant weight to these factors. It (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Trusting Experts and Epistemic Humility in Disability.Anita Ho - 2011 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (2):102-123.
    It is often taken for granted that the professional–patient relationship is one of trust, particularly given that these clinicians are “experts” in their clinical domain. Nonetheless, trusting grants discretionary powers to the trustee, making the truster vulnerable to the trustee (Rogers and Ballantyne 2008). In particular, some patient groups carry certain social vulnerabilities that can be exacerbated when they extend trust to health-care providers (HCPs). Informed by the feminist literature on epistemic hierarchy and oppression, this paper examines how calls to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Racism and Bioethics: Are We Part of the Problem?Anita Ho - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (4):23-25.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Power Hierarchy and Epistemic Injustice in Clinical Ethics Consultation.Anita Ho & Dave Unger - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (1):40-42.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Should Researchers Offer Results to Family Members of Cancer Biobank Participants? A Mixed-Methods Study of Proband and Family Preferences.Deborah R. Gordon, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Marguerite Robinson, Wesley O. Petersen, Jason S. Egginton, Kari G. Chaffee, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan M. Wolf & Barbara A. Koenig - 2019 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 10 (1):1-22.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark