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  1. Walter Charleton, Wellbeing, and the Cartesian Passions.Maks Sipowicz - forthcoming - Intellectual History Review:1-20.
    Walter Charleton is an often-overlooked figure in the history of seventeenth-century philosophy, frequently thought of as a mere conduit for the ideas of others, rather than a significant thinker in his own right. As a self-described “eclectic,” Charleton saw himself as avoiding dogmatism by selecting the best ideas from his sources and fitting them together into a new, coherent system. Here I argue his method allowed him to innovate on his sources, and led to attempts at overcoming the limitations of (...)
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  • Imagining Oneself as Forming a Whole with Others: Descartes’s View of Love.Melanie Tate - 2021 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 3 (1):6.
    In this paper, I address two widespread misconceptions about Descartes’s theory of love. Descartes defines love as a passion that ‘incites [the soul] to join in volition to the objects that appear to be suitable to it’. Several commentators assume joining in volition is an act of judgment, since forming judgments is the primary function of the will in the Meditations. However, I argue joining in volition is an act of imagining a whole one forms with an object of love. (...)
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