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Tales of Love

Columbia University Press (1989)

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  1. The Paradox of Meaning Well While Causing Harm: A Discussion About the Limits of Tolerance Within Democratic Societies.Silvia Edling - 2012 - Journal of Moral Education 41 (4):457-471.
    Curriculum guidelines in many democratic countries argue for the need to practice tolerance as a means to creating peaceful relations. Through moral education, young people are believed to be able to develop a way of being that respects plurality and decreases interpersonal violence in society. But where do students? personal involvements or the issue of unpredictability accompanying inter-personal relations fit into the discussion? This article draws on four young people?s narratives as starting points to discuss the gap between progressive educational (...)
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  • The Maternal Dilemma And Nuptial Ordeals In Jodi Picoult’s Fiction: The Lens Of Maternal Feminism.Ayesha Akram & Muhammad Ayub Jajja - 2018 - Pakistan Journal of Gender Studies 17 (1):19-38.
    Choice is an illusion non-existent in the lives of mothers; and selflessness to them, is not a decision but an encumbrance. This case is proficiently presented by Jodi Picoult in her novel Handle With Care. Dealing with the issues of motherhood and nuptial ties, the novel raises a few important questions in the backdrop of mothering children with special needs. The novel introduces us to a helpless mother fighting for the survival of her dying daughter and gradually moving towards a (...)
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  • Phenomenology, Pomo Baskets, and the Work of Mabel McKay.Sheridan Hough - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):103-113.
    This article characterizes the work of Native basket weaver Mabel McKay, using some of the conceptual tools of twentiethth-century phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Specifically, McKay's baskets have often been described as "living;" Merleau-Ponty's account of the world as "living flesh" seems to suggest a way of thinking about these baskets as more than mere artifacts. I conclude that McKay's baskets are a powerful propaedeutic: they awaken a sense of ourselves as perceivers.
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  • Freud's Oedipus and Kristeva's Narcissus: Three Heterogeneities.Sara Beardsworth - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (1):54-77.
    : The paper shows that three heterogeneities in Freud and Kristeva (unconscious/conscious, semiotic/symbolic, and imaginary/symbolic) expose the historical emergence, significance, and demise of psychic structures that present obstacles to our progressive political thinking. The oedipal and narcissistic structures of subjectivity represent the persistence of two past, bad forms of authority: paternal law and maternal authority. Contemporary psychoanalysis reveals a humankind going through the loss of this past in a process that opens up a different future of sexual difference in Western (...)
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  • Abjection and the Constitutive Nature of Difference: Class Mourning in Margaret's Museum and Legitimating Myths of Innocence in Casablanca.Tina Chanter - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (3):86 - 106.
    This essay examines the connections between ignorance and abjection. Chanter relates Julia Kristeva's notion of abjection to the mechanisms of division found in feminist theory, race theory, film theory, and cultural theory. The neglect of the co-constitutive relationships among such categories as gender, race, and class produces abjection. If those categories are treated as separate parts of a person's identity that merely interlock or intermesh, they are rendered invisible and unknowable even in the very discourses about them. Race thus becomes (...)
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  • L’Écriture Limite: Kristeva's Postmodern Feminist Ethics.Dawne Mccance - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (2):141 - 160.
    In this essay, I trace the development of Julia Kristeva's theory and practice of "the subject in process/on trial" from her semiotic works of the 1960s to her psychoanalytic writings of the 1970s and 1980s. I read Kristeva's exploration of this "subject in process/on trial" as contributing to a postmodern feminist ethics.
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  • Conflicted Love.Kelly Oliver - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (3):1-18.
    : Our stereotypes of maternity and paternity as manifest in the history of philosophy and psychoanalysis interfere with the ability to imagine loving relationships. The associations of maternity with antisocial nature and paternity with disembodied cul-ture are inadequate to set up primary love relationships. Analyzing the conflicts in these associations, I reformulate the maternal body as social and lawful, and I re-formulate the paternal function as embodied, which enables imagining our primary relationships as loving.
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  • The Look of Love.Kelly Oliver - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (3):56-78.
    : I begin to suggest an alternative to the notion of vision based in alienation and hostility put forth by Jean-Paul Sartre, Sigmund Freud, and Jacques Lacan. I diagnose this alienating vision as a result of a particular alienating notion of space presupposed by their theories. I develop Irigaray's comments about light and air to suggest an alternative notion of space that opens up the possibility that vision connects us to others rather than alienates us from them.
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  • (Love is) the Ability of Not Knowing: Feminist Experience of the Impossible in Ethical Singularity.Dawn Rae Davis - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (2):145-161.
    : In neocolonial contexts of globalization, the epistemological terrain of radical diversity poses significant ethical challenges to transnational feminisms. In view of historical associations between knowledge and discourses of love which were conditioned by imperialist brands of humanism and benevolence under colonialism, this paper argues for a deconstructionist approach to conceptualizing love in relation to knowledge and for an ethics that severs the association with benevolence, instead making alterity the basis for its account.
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  • “The Lost Foundation”: Kristeva's Semiotic Chora and Its Ambiguous Legacy.Maria Margaroni - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (1):78-98.
    The aim of this essay is to reclaim Kristeva's concept of the semiotic chora by reinscribing it as an intervention in the context of two important postmodern debates. The first debate relates to the philosophical problem of "the beginning before the Beginning." The second concerns the necessity and possibility of mediation between incommensurable entities: the "demonic" and the social, desire and the Law, material production and representation. I contend: (1) that the introduction of the chora in RPL is part of (...)
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  • Figuration: A Philosophy of Dance.Joshua M. Hall - 2012 - Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    Dance receives relatively little attention in the history of philosophy. My strategy for connecting that history to dance consists in tracing a genealogy of its dance-relevant moments. In preparation, I perform a phenomenological analysis of my own eighteen years of dance experience, in order to generate a small cluster of central concepts or “Moves” for elucidating dance. At this genealogical-phenomenological intersection, I find what I term “positure” most helpfully treated in Plato, Aristotle and Nietzsche; “gesture” similarly in Condillac, Mead and (...)
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  • The Complicated History of Einfühlung.Magdalena Nowak - 2011 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 1 (2):301-326.
    The article analyses the history of the Einfühlung concept. Theories of ‘feeling into’ Nature, works of art or feelings and behaviours of other persons by German philosophers of the second half of the nineteenth century Robert and Friedrich Vischer and Theodor Lipps are evoked, as well as similar theory of understanding (Verstehen) by Wilhelm Dilthey and Friedrich Schleiermacher, to which Dilthey refers. The meaning of the term Einfühlung within Edith Stein’s thought is also analysed. Both Einfühlung and Verstehen were criticized (...)
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  • "Patient Interpretation: Kristeva's Model for the Caregiver".Melinda C. Hall - 2017 - In Sarah Hansen & Rebecca Tuvel (eds.), New Forms of Revolt: Essays on Kristeva's Intimate Politics. Albany, New York: SUNY Press. pp. 107-125.
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  • Against Matricide: Rethinking Subjectivity and the Maternal Body.Alison Stone - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (1):118-138.
    In this article I critically re-examine Julia Kristeva's view that becoming a speaking subject requires psychical matricide: violent separation from the maternal body. I propose an alternative, non-matricidal conception of subjectivity, in part by drawing out anti-matricidal strands in Kristeva's own thought, including her view that early mother–child relations are triangular. Whereas she understands this triangle in terms of a first imaginary father, I re-interpret this triangle using Donald Winnicott's idea of potential space and Jessica Benjamin's idea of an intersubjective (...)
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  • (Un)Concealing the Hedgehog. Modernist and Postmodernist American Poetry and Contemporary Critical Theories.Paulina Ambroży - unknown
    The book is an attempt to explore the affinities between contemporary critical theories and modernist and postmodernist American poetry. The analysis focuses on poststructuralist theories, notorious for their tendency to destabilize generic boundaries between literary, philosophical and critical discourses. The main argument and the structure of the book derive from Jacques Derrida’s essay “Che cos’è la poesia” [What is poetry?] in which the philosopher postulates the impossibility of defining poetry by comparing a poem to a hedgehog – prickly, solitary, untamed, (...)
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  • The Unbearable Weight of Happiness.Carl Fredrik Rudolf Cederstrom & Rickard Grassman - unknown
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  • Poietical Subjects in Heidegger, Kristeva, and Aristotle.Melissa Shew - 2010 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 2 (1):63-80.
    Prompted by Eryximachus’ speech about the relationship between Eros and health in Plato’s Symposium, this paper engages the nature of poiēsis as it arises in the works of Martin Heidegger, Julia Kristeva, and Aristotle. All three address poiēsis as a human activity that points beyond an individual person, and in so doing speaks to what’s possible for human life. Section I addresses Heidegger, whose insistance on the interplay between “earth” and “world” in “The Origin of a Work of Art” speaks (...)
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  • Itinerary of the Knower: Mapping the Ways of Gnosis, Sophia, and Imaginative Education.Antonina Lukenchuk - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (1):41-52.
    My conversion into a knower has been a long and winding road. From childhood reverie to the years of formal schooling, education has never ceased to lure me into its magical power. How do we really get to know/see/learn whatever happens on our educational journey? In this paper, I will re-trace my quest for knowledge that reaches beyond the boundaries of traditional epistemology. My wonderings will take me to explore, via Jung, the possibilities of imaginative education through Gnosis and Sophia. (...)
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  • The Look of Love.Kelly Oliver - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (3):56-78.
    I begin to suggest an alternative to the notion of vision based in alienation and hostility put forth by Jean-Paul Sartre, Sigmund Freud, and Jacques Lacan. I diagnose this alienating vision as a result of a particular alienating notion of space presupposed by their theories. I develop lrigaray's comments about light and air to suggest an alternative notion of space that opens up the possibility that vision connects us to others rather than alienates us from them.
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  • L’Écriture Limite: Kristeva's Postmodern Feminist Ethics.Dawne Mccance - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (2):141-160.
    In this essay, I trace the development of Julia Kristeva's theory and practice of “the subject in procession trial” from her semiotic works of the 1960s to her psychoanalytic writings of the 1970s and 1980s. I read Kristeva's exploration of this “subject in procession trial” as contributing to a postmodern feminist ethics.
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  • Julia Kristeva's Feminist Revolutions.Kelly Oliver - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (3):94-114.
    Julia Kristeva is known as rejecting feminism, nonetheless her work is useful for feminist theory. I reconsider Kristeva's rejection of feminism and her theories of difference, identity, and maternity, elaborating on Kristeva's contributions to debates over the necessity of identity politics, indicating how Kristeva's theory suggests the cause of and possible solutions to women's oppression in Western culture, and, using Kristeva's theory, setting up a framework for a feminist rethinking of politics and ethics.
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  • Moral Reflection: Beyond Impartial Reason.Diana Tietjens Meyers - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (3):21 - 47.
    This paper considers two accounts of the self that have gained prominence in contemporary feminist psychoanalytic theory and draws out the implications of these views with respect to the problem of moral reflection. I argue that our account of moral reflection will be impoverished unless it mobilizes the capacity to empathize with others and the rhetoric of figurative language. To make my case for this claim, I argue that John Rawls's account of reflective equilibrium suffers from his exclusive reliance on (...)
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  • Freud's Oedipus and Kristeva's Narcissus: Three Heterogeneities.Sara Beardsworth - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (1):54-77.
    The paper shows that three heterogeneities in Freud and Kristeva expose the historical emergence, significance, and demise of psychic structures that present obstacles to our progressive political thinking. The oedipal and narcissistic structures of subjectivity represent the persistence of two past, bad forms of authority: paternal law and maternal authority. Contemporary psychoanalysis reveals a humankind going through the loss of this past in a process that opens up a different future of sexual difference in Western cultures.
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  • The Ability of Not Knowing: Feminist Experience of the Impossible in Ethical Singularity.Dawn Rae Davis - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (2):145-161.
    In neocolonial contexts of globalization, the epistemological terrain of radical diversity poses significant ethical challenges to transnational feminisms. In view of historical associations between knowledge and discourses of love which were conditioned by imperialist brands of humanism and benevolence under colonialism, this paper argues for a deconstructionist approach to conceptualizing love in relation to knowledge and for an ethics that severs the association with benevolence, instead making alterity the basis for its account.
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  • Conflicted Love.Kelly Oliver - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (3):1-18.
    Our stereotypes of maternity and paternity as manifest in the history of philosophy and psychoanalysis interfere with the ability to imagine loving relationships. The associations of maternity with antisocial nature and paternity with disembodied culture are inadequate to set up primary love relationships. Analyzing the conflicts in these associations, I reformulate the maternal body as social and lawful, and I reformulate the paternal function as embodied, which enables imagining our primary relationships as loving.
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  • Blood Relations: Feminist Theory Meets the Uncanny Alien Bug Mother.Lynda Zwinger - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (2):74 - 90.
    This essay addresses the troubling and uncanny figure of Mother in feminist theory, psychoanalytic theory, literary criticism, and real life. Readings of feminist literary criticism and the films Alien and Aliens explore the liminality of Mother and the consequences for feminist thought and practice of the persistent narrative modes (the sentimental and the gothic) locatable in all of these discourses on/of Motherhood.
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  • On Negativity in Revolution in Poetic Language.Sina Kramer - 2013 - Continental Philosophy Review 46 (3):465-479.
    Kristeva’s Revolution in Poetic Language offers a challenge to theories of the subject in psychoanalysis, linguistic theory, and in philosophy. Central to that challenge is Kristeva’s conception of negativity. In this article, I trace the development of the concept of negativity in Revolution in Poetic Language from its root in Hegel, to rejection, which Kristeva develops out of Freud. Both are crucial to the development of the material dialectic between the semiotic and the symbolic that makes up Kristeva’s subject-in-process/on trial. (...)
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  • Embodied Disbelief: Poststructural Feminist Atheism.Donovan O. Schaefer - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (2):371-387.
    “I quite rightly pass for an atheist,” Jacques Derrida announces in Circumfession. Grace Jantzen's suggestion that the poststructuralist critique of modernity can also be trained on atheism helps us make sense of this playfully cryptic statement: although Derrida sympathizes with the “idea” of atheism, he is wary of the modern brand of atheism, with its insistence on rationally arranging—straightening out—religion. In this paper, I will argue that poststructural feminism, with its focus on embodied epistemology, offers a way to re-explain Derrida's (...)
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  • Calvin O. Schrag, the Self After Postmodernity.Huntington Patricia - 1998 - Human Studies 21 (2):197-206.
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  • To Hear—to Say: The Mediating Presence of the Healing Witness. [REVIEW]Sheryl Brahnam - 2012 - AI and Society 27 (1):53-90.
    Illness and trauma challenge self-narratives. Traumatized individuals, unable to speak about their experiences, suffer in isolation. In this paper, I explore Kristeva’s theories of the speaking subject and signification, with its symbolic and semiotic modalities, to understand how a person comes to speak the unspeakable. In discussing the origin of the speaking subject, Kristeva employs Plato’s chora (related to choreo , “to make room for”). The chora reflects the mother’s preparation of the child’s entry into language and forms an interior (...)
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  • Alterity Within Bergman'spersona: Face to Face with the Other. [REVIEW]Kelly Oliver - 1995 - Journal of Value Inquiry 29 (4):521-532.
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  • Review of Kelly Oliver’s “The Colonization of Psychic Space: Toward a Psychoanalytic Social Theory”. [REVIEW]Stacy Keltner - 2008 - Symposia on Gender, Race, and Philosophy 4 (1).
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  • Education for Sexism: A Theoretical Analysis of the Sex/Gender Bias in Education.Bronwyn Davies - 1989 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 21 (1):1–19.
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  • Enhancing Evolution:Whose Body? Whose Choice?Kelly Oliver - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (s1):74-96.
    This essay critically engages the work of John Harris and Jürgen Habermas on the issue of genetic engineering. It does so from the standpoint of women's embodied experience of pregnancy and parenting, challenging the choice–chance binary at work in these accounts.
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  • Sacrificed Lives: Mimetic Desire, Sexual Difference and Murder.Pamela Sue Anderson - 2000 - Cultural Values 4 (2):216-227.
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  • Psychoanalytic Feminism.Emily Zakin - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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