Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Privacy and Punishment.Mark Tunick - 2013 - Social Theory and Practice 39 (4):643-668.
    Philosophers have focused on why privacy is of value to innocent people with nothing to hide. I argue that for people who do have something to hide, such as a past crime, or bad behavior in a public place, informational privacy can be important for avoiding undeserved or disproportionate non-legal punishment. Against the objection that one cannot expect privacy in public facts, I argue that I might have a legitimate privacy interest in public facts that are not readily accessible, or (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • An Eye for an Eye: Proportionality and Surveillance.Kevin Macnish - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (3):529-548.
    It is often claimed that surveillance should be proportionate, but it is rarely made clear exactly what proportionate surveillance would look like beyond an intuitive sense of an act being excessive. I argue that surveillance should indeed be proportionate and draw on Thomas Hurka’s work on proportionality in war to inform the debate on surveillance. After distinguishing between the proportionality of surveillance per se, and surveillance as a particular act, I deal with objections to using proportionality as a legitimate ethical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Treating People as Equals: Ethical Objections to Racial Profiling and the Composition of Juries. [REVIEW]Annabelle Lever - 2011 - The Journal of Ethics 15 (1-2):61 - 78.
    This paper shows that the problem of treating people as equals in a world marked by deep-seated and, often, recalcitrant inequalities has implications for the way we approach the provision of security and justice. On the one hand, it means that racial profiling will generally be unjustified even when it might promote collective interests in security, on the other, it means that we should strive to create racially mixed juries, even in cases where defendant and alleged-victim are of the same (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Relative Moral Risks of Untargeted and Targeted Surveillance.Katerina Hadjimatheou - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (2):187-207.
    Is surveillance that is targeted towards specific individuals easier to justify than surveillance that targets broad categories of people? Untargeted surveillance is routinely accused of treating innocent people as suspects in ways that are unfair and of failing to pursue security effectively. I argue that in a wide range of cases untargeted surveillance treats people less like suspects than more targeted alternatives. I also argue that it often deters unwanted behaviour more effectively than targeted alternatives, including profiling. In practice, untargeted (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Privacy and Social Interaction.B. Roessler & D. Mokrosinska - 2013 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (8):771-791.
    This article joins in and extends the contemporary debate on the right to privacy. We bring together two strands of the contemporary discourse on privacy. While we endorse the prevailing claim that norms of informational privacy protect the autonomy of individual subjects, we supplement it with an argument demonstrating that privacy is an integral element of the dynamics of all social relationships. This latter claim is developed in terms of the social role theory and substantiated by an analysis of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Moral Rights and the Problem of Privacy in Public: A Reply to Lever and Goold.Jesper Ryberg - 2008 - Res Publica 14 (1):49-56.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark