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  1. Primitive Humour.Philip Letts & J. Routledge, Andrew - manuscript
    This article examines the question ‘what is humour?’ In section 1, we set out default realist presuppositions about the question. In section 2, we characterize a broadly Moorean approach to answering the question. In section 3, we introduce popular response-dependence assumptions about humour and express puzzlement about their popularity. In section 4, we present extant answers to our question: superiority theory; relief theory; play theory; laughter-dispositional theory; and incongruity theory. We find each wanting, subjecting incongruity theory, in particular, to sustained (...)
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  • Humor, Power and Culture: A New Theory on the Experience and Ethics of Humor.Jennifer Marra - 2019 - Dissertation, Marquette University
    The aim of this dissertation is to offer a new theory of humor that takes seriously both the universality and power of humor in culture. In the first chapter, I summarize historical and contemporary theories, and show how each either 1) fails to give any definition of humor, 2) fails as a theory of humor, and/or 3) underappreciates, dismisses, or does not consider the power of humor in experience. The second chapter explains the failures of prior theories by understanding the (...)
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  • Samuel Beckett’s Humour: Attuning Philosophy and Literary Criticism.Michela Bariselli - 2019 - Dissertation, University of Reading
    This thesis explores and describes the comic features of Samuel Beckett’s prose works. It explores fundamental questions about Beckett’s humour. On the one hand, it investigates the nature of humour, and, on the other, it investigates what counts as humour in Beckett. This twofold investigation requires ‘attuning’ philosophy and literary criticism, where questions and tools of each discipline mutually sharpen and refine each other. Chapter 1 evaluates philosophical accounts of humour and identifies Incongruity Theory as the theory offering the best (...)
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  • Not Sitting Down for It: How Stand‐Up Differs From Fiction.E. M. Dadlez - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (4):513-524.
    ABSTRACT One of the standard defenses of Daniel Tosh, Andrew Dice Clay, Bernard Manning, and other stand-up comedians who have been accused of crossing moral lines is that the responses they elicit belong to an aesthetic rather than a moral domain to which standard methods of ethical evaluation are therefore inapplicable. I argue, first, that fictionality does not confer immunity to ethical criticism and, second, that the stance adopted by the stand-up artist is not fully analogous to a fictive one (...)
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  • “Pure Joy”: Spinoza on Laughter and Cheerfulness.Lydia Amir - 2020 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 58 (4):500-533.
    The Southern Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  • A Comedian and a Fascist Walk Into Freud's Bar: On the Mass Character of Stand‐Up Comedy.Martin Shuster - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (4):525-534.
    This article explores the psychoanalytic points of commonality between stand‐up comedy shows and fascist rallies, arguing that both are concerned with the creation of a “mass” audience. The article explores the political significance of this analogy by arguing that while stand‐up shows are not as regressive as fascist rallies, their “mass” character does run counter to any political aspirations they may have toward the end of critical consciousness raising.
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  • Amusement and Beyond.Steffen Steinert - 2017 - Dissertation, LMU München
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