Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Self and its Causal Powers Between Metaphysics and Science.Rodolfo Giorgi & Andrea Lavazza - 2020 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 11 (1):1-25.
    According to the thesis of powerism, our world is pervaded by causal powers which are metaphysically basic. The aim of this paper is to defend the existence of the self, defined as a substantial entity, and its mental powers. This claim, which may seem a bold one, should not be deemed as inconsistent with scientific evidence. In fact, this approach does not ignore empirical knowledge, but is not bound only to it in order to understand entities, properties, and the relationship (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Aristotle's Ontology of Change.Mark Sentesy - 2020 - Chicago, IL, USA: Northwestern University Press.
    This book investigates what change is, according to Aristotle, and how it affects his conception of being. Mark Sentesy argues that change leads Aristotle to develop first-order metaphysical concepts such as matter, potency, actuality, sources of being, and the teleology of emerging things. He shows that Aristotle’s distinctive ontological claim—that being is inescapably diverse in kind—is anchored in his argument for the existence of change. -/- Aristotle may be the only thinker to have given a noncircular definition of change. When (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Change, Agency and the Incomplete in Aristotle.Andreas Anagnostopoulos - 2017 - Phronesis 62 (2):170-209.
    Aristotle’s most fundamental distinction between changes and other activities is not that ofMetaphysicsΘ.6, between end-exclusive and end-inclusive activities, but one implicit inPhysics3.1’s definition of change, between the activity of something incomplete and the activity of something complete. Notably, only the latter distinction can account for Aristotle’s view, inPhysics3.3, that ‘agency’—effecting change in something, e.g. teaching—does not qualify strictly as a change. This distinction informsDe Anima2.5 and imparts unity to Aristotle’s extended treatment of change inPhysics3.1-3.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Ἡ Κίνησις Τῆς Τέχνης: Crafts and Souls as Principles of Change.Patricio A. Fernandez & Jorge Mittelmann - 2017 - Phronesis 62 (2):136-169.
    Aristotle’s soul is a first principle of every vital change in an animal, in the way that a craft is a cause of its product’s coming-to-be. We argue that the soul’s causal efficacy cannot therefore be reduced to the formal constitution of vital phenomena, or to discrete interventions into independently constituted processes, but involves the exercise of vital powers. This reading does better justice to Aristotle’s conception of craft as a rational productive disposition; and it captures the soul’s continuous causal (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Suárez's Non-Reductive Theory of Efficient Causation.Jacob Tuttle - 2016 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 4 (1):125-158.
    This paper examines an important but neglected topic in Suárez’s metaphysics–—namely, his theory of efficient causation. According to Suárez, efficient causation is to be identified with action, one of Aristotle’s ten highest genera or categories. The paper shows how Suárez’s identification of efficient causation with action helps to shed light on his views about the precise nature of efficient causation, and its role in his ontology. More specifically, it shows that Suárez understands efficient causation to be a distinctive or sui (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Causes as Powers: Stephen Mumford and Rani Lill Anjum: Getting Causes From Powers. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011, 272pp, £35 HB. [REVIEW]Jennifer McKitrick, Anna Marmodoro, Stephen Mumford & Rani Lill Anjum - 2013 - Metascience 22 (3):545-559.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Aquinas’ Ontology of Transeunt Causal Activity.Gloria Frost - 2018 - Vivarium 56 (1-2):47-82.
    This paper reconstructs and analyzes Thomas Aquinas’ intriguing views on transeunt causal activity, which have been the subject of an interpretive debate spanning from the fifteenth century up until the present. In his Physics commentary, Aquinas defends the Aristotelian positions that the actualization of an agent’s active potential is the motion that it causes in its patient and action and passion are the same motion. Yet, in other texts, Aquinas claims that action differs from passion and “action is in the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • John Duns Scotus Versus Thomas Aquinas on Action-Passion Identity.Can Laurens Löwe - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (6):1027-1044.
    ABSTRACTThis paper examines Thomas Aquinas’ and John Duns Scotus’ respective views on the action-passion identity thesis. This thesis, which goes back to Aristotle, states that when an agent causes a change in a patient, then the agent’s causing of the change is identical to the patient’s undergoing of said change. Action and passion are, on this view, one and the same change in the patient, albeit under two distinct descriptions. The first part of the paper considers Aquinas’ defence of this (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations