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  1. Proving Nothing and Illustrating Much: The Case of Michael Balint.Shaul Bar-Haim - 2020 - History of the Human Sciences 33 (3-4):47-65.
    John Forrester’s book Thinking in Cases does not provide one ultimate definition of what it means to ‘think in cases’, but rather several alternatives: a ‘style of reasoning’, ‘paradigms’ or ‘exemplars’, and ‘language games’, to mention only a few. But for Forrester, the stories behind each of the figures who suggested these different models for thinking are as important as the models themselves. In other words, the question for Forrester is not only what ‘thinking in cases’ is, but also who (...)
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  • Revisiting Foucault's ‘Normative Confusions’: Surveying the Debate Since the Collège de France Lectures.Christopher R. Mayes - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (12):841-855.
    At once historical and philosophical, Michel Foucault used his genealogical method to expose the contingent conditions constituting the institutions, sciences and practices of the present. His analyses of the asylum, clinic, prison and sexuality revealed the historical, political and epistemological forces that make up certain types of subjects, sciences and sites of control. Although noting the originality of his work, a number of early critics questioned the normative framework of Foucault's method. Nancy Fraser argued that Foucault's genealogical method was ‘normatively (...)
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