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  1. Inclusive and Exclusive Social Preferences: A Deweyan Framework to Explain Governance Heterogeneity.Silvia Sacchetti - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (3):473-485.
    This paper wishes to problematize the foundations of production governance and offer an analytical perspective on the interrelation between agents’ preferences, strategic choice, and the public sphere . The value is in the idea of preferences being social in nature and in the application both to the internal stakeholders of the organisation and its impacts on people outside. Using the concept of ‘strategic failure’ we suggest that social preferences reflected in deliberative social praxis can reduce false beliefs and increase individual (...)
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  • John Dewey on the Reflective Moral Life: Renewing His Lessons for Moral Education Today.Jessica Ching-Sze Wang - 2016 - Philosophy Study 6 (3).
    Moral education as practiced in schools today roughly falls into two kinds, either taught as an independent subject or practiced as a form of school-wide social learning. Dewey’s criticism of rigid moral training in traditional schools gives credence to the latter trend. For instance, in 2000 Taiwan’s Ministry of Education decided to eliminate moral education as a required subject from the national school curriculum and suggested that all schools and teachers should infuse morality into the school culture as a whole. (...)
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  • Business Research, Self-Fulfilling Prophecy, and the Inherent Responsibility of Scholars.Michaël Gonin - 2007 - Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (1):33-58.
    Business research and teaching institutions play an important role in shaping the way businesses perceive their relations to the broader society and its moral expectations. Hence, as ethical scandals recently arose in the business world, questions related to the civic responsibilities of business scholars and to the role business schools play in society have gained wider interest. In this article, I argue that these ethical shortcomings are at least partly resulting from the mainstream business model with its taken-for granted basic (...)
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  • Business Research, Self-Fulfilling Prophecy, and the Inherent Responsibility of Scholars.Gonin Michaël - unknown
    Business research and teaching institutions play an important role in shaping the way businesses perceive their relations to the broader society and its moral expectations. Hence, as ethical scandals recently arose in the business world, questions related to the civic responsibilities of business scholars and to the role business schools play in society have gained wider interest. In this article, I argue that these ethical shortcomings are at least partly resulting from the mainstream business model with its taken-for granted basic (...)
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  • From Rational to Wise Action: Recasting Our Theories of Entrepreneurship.Laura C. Dunham - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):513-530.
    In this article, I argue that if we challenge some tacit assumptions of narrow rationality that endure in much of entrepreneurial studies, we can elevate entrepreneurial ethics beyond mere external constraints on rational action, and move toward fuller integration of ethics as an intrinsic part of the process of value creation itself. To this end, I propose the concept of practical wisdom as a framework for exploring entrepreneurial decision making and action that can broaden the scope of our research to (...)
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  • Ethical Room for Manoeuvre: Implementation Without Principles.V. M. M. Pompe & M. J. J. A. A. Korthals - unknown
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  • Related Debates in Ethics and Entrepreneurship: Values, Opportunities, and Contingency.Susan S. Harmeling, Saras D. Sarasvathy & R. Edward Freeman - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):341-365.
    In this paper, we review two seemingly unrelated debates. In business ethics, the argument is about values: are they universal or emergent? In entrepreneurship, it is about opportunities – are they discovered or constructed? In reality, these debates are similar as they both overlook contingency. We draw insight from pragmatism to define contingency as possibility without necessity. We analyze real-life narratives and show how entrepreneurship and ethics emerge from our discussion as parallel streams of thought.
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  • Uncertainties of Nutrigenomics and Their Ethical Meaning.Michiel Korthals & Rixt Komduur - 2010 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (5):435-454.
    Again and again utopian hopes are connected with the life sciences (no hunger, health for everyone; life without diseases, longevity), but simultaneously serious research shows uncertain, incoherent, and ambivalent results. It is unrealistic to expect that these uncertainties will disappear. We start by providing a not exhaustive list of five different types of uncertainties end-users of nutrigenomics have to cope with without being able to perceive them as risks and to subject them to risk-analysis. First, genes connected with the human (...)
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  • Ethical Room for Maneuver: Playground for the Food Business.Vincent Pompe & Michiel Korthals - 2010 - Business and Society Review 115 (3):367-391.
    In a world of glossy corporate social responsibility reports, the shallowness of the actual CSR results may well be its counterpart. We claim that the possible gaps between aspirations and implementations are due to the company's overrating abilities to deal with the irrational and complex moral world of business. Many academic approaches aim to lift business ethics up to a higher level by enhancing competences but will fail because they are too rationalistic and generalistic to match the pluralistic and situational (...)
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