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  1. Islamic Education and Cosmopolitanism: A Philosophical Interlude.Yusef Waghid - 2014 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (3):329-342.
    This article takes a critical look at three conceptions of Islamic education. I argue that conceptions of Islamic education ought to be considered as existing on a minimalist–maximalist continuum, meaning that the concepts associated with Islamic education do not have a single meaning, but that meanings are shaped depending on the minimalist and maximalist conditions which constitute them, that is, tarbiyyah (nurturing), ta`lim (learning) and ta`dib (goodness). I then explore some liberal conceptions of cosmopolitanism, showing how these notions connect with (...)
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  • Philosophers Without Borders? Toward a Comparative Philosophy of Education.Jeffrey Ayala Milligan, Enoch Stanfill, Anton Widyanto & Huajun Zhang - 2011 - Educational Studies: Journal of the American Educational Studies Association 47 (1):50-70.
    One important element of globalization is the dissemination of western educational ideals and organizational frameworks through educational development projects. While postcolonial theory has long offered a useful critique of this expansion, it is less clear about how educational development that eschews neo-imperialist tendencies might proceed. This problem poses a question that requires philosophical reflection. However, much of comparative and international development education ignores philosophical modes of inquiry. Moreover, as Libbrecht (2007) argues, philosophy all too often sees itself as synonymous with (...)
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  • Re‐Envisioning the Future: Democratic Citizenship Education and Islamic Education.Yusef Waghid & Paul Smeyers - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (4):539-558.
    In this article we address the issue of why democratic citizenship education should be incorporated more meaningfully into Islamic education discourses in formal institutions in the Arab and Muslim world. In the Arab and Muslim world civic and national education seem to be the dominant discourses. We argue that the latter discourses are inadequate to address some of the dystopias in the Arab and Muslim world such as the perpetuation of patriarchy, uncritical obedience to the state , and blind patriotism. (...)
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