Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Towards Ending the Animal Cognition War: A Three-Dimensional Model of Causal Cognition.Tobias Benjamin Starzak & Russell David Gray - 2021 - Biology and Philosophy 36 (2):1-24.
    Debates in animal cognition are frequently polarized between the romantic view that some species have human-like causal understanding and the killjoy view that human causal reasoning is unique. These apparently endless debates are often characterized by conceptual confusions and accusations of straw-men positions. What is needed is an account of causal understanding that enables researchers to investigate both similarities and differences in cognitive abilities in an incremental evolutionary framework. Here we outline the ways in which a three-dimensional model of causal (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • From Allostatic Agents to Counterfactual Cognisers: Active Inference, Biological Regulation, and the Origins of Cognition.Andrew W. Corcoran, Giovanni Pezzulo & Jakob Hohwy - 2020 - Biology and Philosophy 35 (3):1-45.
    What is the function of cognition? On one influential account, cognition evolved to co-ordinate behaviour with environmental change or complexity. Liberal interpretations of this view ascribe cognition to an extraordinarily broad set of biological systems—even bacteria, which modulate their activity in response to salient external cues, would seem to qualify as cognitive agents. However, equating cognition with adaptive flexibility per se glosses over important distinctions in the way biological organisms deal with environmental complexity. Drawing on contemporary advances in theoretical biology (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Mating Dances and the Evolution of Language: What’s the Next Step?Cameron Buckner & Keyao Yang - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (6):1289-1316.
    The Darwinian protolanguage hypothesis is one of the most popular theories of the evolution of human language. According to this hypothesis, language evolved through a three stage process involving general increases in intelligence, the emergence of grammatical structure as a result of sexual selection on protomusical songs, and finally the attachment of meaning to the components of those songs. The strongest evidence for the second stage of this process has been considered to be birdsong, and as a result researchers have (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Animal Cognition.Kristin Andrews - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Entry for the Stanford Encylcopedia of Philosophy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations