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Beginning the 'Longer Way'

In G. R. F. Ferrari (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Plato's Republic. Cambridge University Press. pp. 310--344 (2007)

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  1. “Chalepa Ta Kala,” “Fine Things Are Difficult”: Socrates’ Insights Into the Psychology of Teaching and Learning. [REVIEW]Avi I. Mintz - 2010 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (3):287-299.
    The proverb “chalepa ta kala” is invoked in three dialogues in the Platonic corpus: Hippias Major, Cratylus and Republic. In this paper, I argue that the context in which the proverb arises reveals Socrates’ considerable pedagogical dexterity as he uses the proverb to rebuke his interlocutor in one dialogue but to encourage his interlocutors in another. In the third, he gauges his interlocutors’ mention of the proverb to be indicative of their preparedness for a more difficult philosophical trial. What emerges (...)
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  • The Supremacy of Dialectic in Plato’s Philebus.George Harvey - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):279-301.
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  • From Intermediates Through Eidetic Numbers: Plato on the Limits of Counting.Andy German - 2018 - Plato Journal 18:111-124.
    Many have argued that Plato’s intermediates are not independent entities. Rather, they exemplify the incapacity of discursive thought to cognizing Forms. But just what does this incapacity consist in? Any successful answer will require going beyond the intermediates themselves to another aspect of Plato’s mathematical thought - his attribution of a quasi-numerical structure to Forms. For our purposes, the most penetrating account of eidetic numbers is Jacob Klein’s, who saw clearly that eidetic numbers are part of Plato’s inquiry into the (...)
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  • The Problem is Not Mathematics, but Mathematicians: Plato and the Mathematicians Again.H. H. Benson - 2012 - Philosophia Mathematica 20 (2):170-199.
    I argue against a formidable interpretation of Plato’s Divided Line image according to which dianoetic correctly applies the same method as dialectic. The difference between the dianoetic and dialectic sections of the Line is not methodological, but ontological. I maintain that while this interpretation correctly identifies the mathematical method with dialectic, ( i.e. , the method of philosophy), it incorrectly identifies the mathematical method with dianoetic. Rather, Plato takes dianoetic to be a misapplication of the mathematical method by a subset (...)
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  • Mathematics, Mental Imagery, and Ontology: A New Interpretation of the Divided Line.Miriam Byrd - 2018 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 12 (2):111-131.
    This paper presents a new interpretation of the objects of dianoia in Plato’s divided line, contending that they are mental images of the Forms hypothesized by the dianoetic reasoner. The paper is divided into two parts. A survey of the contemporary debate over the identity of the objects of dianoia yields three criteria a successful interpretation should meet. Then, it is argued that the mental images interpretation, in addition to proving consistent with key passages in the middle books of the (...)
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  • Platonic Education : Teaching Virtue in a Constantly Changing Moral Culture.Michael Richard Hart - unknown
    In this thesis I shall argue (1) that for Plato ‘moral’ education, rightly understood (or ‘Platonic education’ as I shall call it), can be an effective method for cultivating virtue in non-ideal societies; (2) that Platonic education is a process that occurs (or Plato hopes might occur) through an engagement with some of the dialogues; (3) that Platonic education strongly mirrors Sokratic discourse in its aims; (4) that Plato’s whole approach to education should be understood mainly from the context of (...)
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  • The Unorthodox Theory of Forms in Plato's Philebus.James Wood - 2017 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):45.
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