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  1. Mou Zongsan on Zen Buddhism.Chan Wing-Cheuk - 2005 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (1):73-88.
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  • Sense, Being and the Revelatory Event: Deleuze and Metamorphosis.Peter Hertz-Ohmes - 2010 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 4 (1):83-91.
    Metamorphosis is a sudden change, a ‘becoming-other’ in life or in philosophical perspective. A revelatory event initiates in a double manner the move from Heidegger's futile search for a transcendental IT that delivers perceptible beings to the confident positing of Deleuze's transcendental empiricism, suffused with the IF of incorporeal sense. In the process Deleuze dramatically enacts his personal connection between sense (Sinn) and being (Sein).
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  • Four Things and Two Practices: Rethinking Heidegger Ex Oriente Lux.John Maraldo - 2012 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (1):53 - 74.
    This article re-orients Heidegger’s analyses of things to cast light on two distinct ways of relating to things, one at the root of technological use and the other crucial to artistic creation. The first way, which we may call instrumental practice, denotes the activity of using something to accomplish some goal or objective. This practice underlies the analysis of use-things [Zeuge] that Heidegger presents in Being and Time. Heidegger’s contribution there is twofold: to show how understanding things as zuhanden, there (...)
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  • Four Things and Two Practices: Rethinking Heidegger Ex Oriente Lux.John Maraldo - 2012 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (1):53-74.
    This article re-orients Heidegger's analyses of things to cast light on two distinct ways of relating to things, one at the root of technological use and the other crucial to artistic creation. The first way, which we may call instrumental practice, denotes the activity of using something to accomplish some goal or objective. This practice underlies the analysis of use-things [Zeuge] that Heidegger presents in Being and Time. Heidegger's contribution there is twofold: to show how understanding things as zuhanden, there (...)
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  • Spirituality, Economics, and Education A Dialogic Critique of Spiritual Capital.J. Gregory Keller & Robert J. Helfenbein - 2008 - Nebula 5 (4):109-128.
    This paper consists of a conversation between a philosopher specialising in ethics and religion and an educational researcher with an interest in cultural studies and contemporary social theory. Dialogic in form, this paper employs an interdisciplinary response to an interdisciplinary project and offers the following components: a dialogic theorizing of the implications for education of a research project on spiritual capital; a continuation of the project of analyzing moral thinking in various cultural and societal settings; a continuation of the project (...)
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  • Theories of Consciousness & Death.Gregory Nixon (ed.) - 2016 - New York, USA: QuantumDream.
    What happens to the inner light of consciousness with the death of the individual body and brain? Reductive materialism assumes it simply fades to black. Others think of consciousness as indicating a continuation of self, a transformation, an awakening or even alternatives based on the quality of life experience. In this issue, speculation drawn from theoretic research are presented. -/- Table of Contents Epigraph: From “The Immortal”, Jorge Luis Borges iii Editor’s Introduction: I Killed a Squirrel the Other Day, Gregory (...)
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  • Beyond the Circle of Life.Gregory Nixon (ed.) - 2017 - New York: QuantumDream.
    It seems certain to me that I will die and stay dead. By “I”, I mean me, Greg Nixon, this person, this self-identity. I am so intertwined with the chiasmus of lives, bodies, ecosystems, symbolic intersubjectivity, and life on this particular planet that I cannot imagine this identity continuing alone without them. However, one may survive one’s life by believing in universal awareness, perfection, and the peace that passes all understanding. Perhaps, we bring this back with us to the Source (...)
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  • Immersive Ideals / Critical Distances : Study of the Affinity Between Artistic Ideologies in Virtual Reality and Previous Immersive Idioms.Joseph Nechvatal - 2010 - LAP Lambert Academic Publishing AG & Co KG.
    My research into Virtual Reality technology and its central property of immersion has indicated that immersion in Virtual Reality (VR) electronic systems is a significant key to the understanding of contemporary culture as well as considerable aspects of previous culture as detected in the histories of philosophy and the visual arts. The fundamental change in aesthetic perception engendered by immersion, a perception which is connected to the ideal of total-immersion in virtual space, identifies certain shifts in ontology which are relevant (...)
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  • An East Asian Perspective of Mind-Body.S. Nagatomo & G. Leisman - 1996 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 21 (4):439-466.
    This paper addresses a need to re-examine the mind-body dualism established since Descartes. Descartes' dualism has been regarded by modern philosophers as an extremely insufficient solution to the problem of mind and body, from which is derived a long opposition in modern epistomology between idealism and empiricism. This dualism, bifurcating the region of spirit and matter, and the dichotomous models of thinking based on this dualism, have long dominated the world of modern philosophy and science. The paper examines states of (...)
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  • Unpacking Ontological Security: A Decolonial Reading of Scholarly Impact.Riyad A. Shahjahan & Anne E. Wagner - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (8):779-791.
    Despite the growing debate about scholarly impact, an analysis of the onto-epistemic grammar underlying impact has remained absent. By taking a different analytical approach to examining impact, we interrogate the concept through the lens of decolonial thought. We offer an empathetic review of the impact scholarship and illuminate the limits of the modern imaginary that circumscribe critiques of impact in the literature, making visible the Eurocentric and provincial horizons of modern reason underlying these critiques and impact in general. Drawing on (...)
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  • Conversing in Emptiness: Rethinking Cross-Cultural Dialogue with the Kyoto School.Bret W. Davis - 2014 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:171-194.
    As we attempt to engender a dialogue between different philosophical traditions, one of the first of the topics which need to be addressed is that of the very nature of dialogue. In other words, we need to engage in a dialogue about dialogue. Toward that end, this essay attempts to rethink the nature of dialogue from the perspective of two key members of the Kyoto School, namely its founder, Nishida Kitar1945), and its current central figure, Ueda Shizuteru (b. 1926). The (...)
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  • Neurofenomenologia: Metodologiczne Lekarstwo Na Trudny Problem.Francisco Varela - 2010 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 1 (1):31-75.
    This paper responds to the issues raised by D. Chalmers by offering a research direction which is quite radical because of the way in which methodological principles are linked to scientific studies of consciousness. Neuro-phenomenology is the name I use here to designate a quest to marry modern cognitive science and a disciplined approach to human experience, thereby placing myself in the lineage of the continental tradition of Phenomenology. My claim is that the so-called hard problem that animates these Special (...)
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  • Critique of Modernity in the Philosophy of Nishitani Keiji.Niklas Söderman - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (3):224-240.
    ABSTRACTThis article analyses Nishitani Keiji’s persistent critique of modernity and how it intertwines with other issues—such as nihilism, science and religion—in his philosophy. While Nishitani gained some notoriety for his views on overcoming modernity during WWII, this article will look at his relationship with the issue more in the scope of his whole philosophical career. Pulling together various strands that weave through Nishitani’s treatment of modernity, its relation to nihilism and his views for overcoming both, we find that it motivates (...)
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  • The Task of Ordinary Mind: Rethinking Authenticity Through the Mumonkan.Carolyn Culbertson - 2010 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 2 (1):91-104.
    This essay explores the nature of authenticity through a comparison of Martin Heidegger and the classical Buddhist text, the Mumonkan (The Gateless Gate). As Stanley Cavell's interpretations of Heidegger have developed, the peculiarity of Heidegger's sense of authenticity lies in the fact that it requires us, not to negate the inauthentic everydayness into which we are fallen, but to learn to inhabit this everydayness in a new way. The task of authenticity, Cavell argues, involves a recovery and a transformation of (...)
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  • Searching for the High-I.Jim Hanson - 2005 - Asian Philosophy 15 (3):247 – 264.
    This paper questions the nature and existence of the ego and I from a Western and Eastern viewpoint, which has been a question for 2,500 years when the Buddha rejected the Brahman idea of ātman. The answer for an ego depends partly on the state of consciousness; the existence of the Western objectifying ego is undeniable in ordinary consciousness, but not in extraordinary consciousness with no objectifying. The subtle question remains about the existence of an I that is distinct from (...)
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  • Whitehead's Doctrine of Objectification and Yogācāra Buddhism's Theory of the Three Natures.Adam C. Scarfe - 2002 - Contemporary Buddhism 3 (2):111-125.
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  • Kant's Noumenon and Sunyata.Laura E. Weed - 2002 - Asian Philosophy 12 (2):77 – 95.
    This paper compares Kant's positions on space, time, the relational character of noumena, and the relational character of the self, with the somewhat similar accounts of those things in two philosophers of the Kyoto school: Keiji Nishitani and Nishida Kitaro. I will argue that the philosophers of the Kyoto school had a more coherent and better integrated account of those ideas, that was open to Kant. I think that the comparison both clarifies Kant's position on these topics, and elucidates the (...)
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  • Dependent Origination and the Dual‐Nature of the Japanese Aesthetic.Jennifer Mcmahon Railey - 1997 - Asian Philosophy 7 (2):123 – 132.
    As most commentators on Japanese aesthetics agree, the Japanese aesthetic is pervaded by a profound affirmation of things in their suchness or original uniqueness, and at the same time is tinged with an element of sadness or melancholy. While the responses of affirmation and melancholy seem rather subjective and may—at first glance—appear inconsistent with Buddhist notions like anatman, or non-self and the Buddhist demand for non-attachment, I shall argue that a more careful reading of certain Buddhist doctrines, specifically the doctrine (...)
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  • Technology From the Standpoint of Sunyata.Alessandro Tomasi - 2008 - Asian Philosophy 18 (3):197 – 212.
    _Keiji Nishitani's critique of technology as a dehumanizing force is objected to by showing that it is possible to establish a relationship with technology characterized by the standpoint of sunyata. In order to support my claim, I offer an interpretation of sunyata as a lived experience in which knowing and being are unified. One method used to experience the identity of knowing and being is the method of negatio negationis. I argue that technology embodies this method, and that thus has (...)
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  • Searching for the Power–I: Nietzsche and Nirvana.Jim Hanson - 2008 - Asian Philosophy 18 (3):231 – 244.
    _The usual approach in Buddhist-Western writings uses Buddhist perspectives to help answer Western philosophical-psychological questions. This paper reverses the process and uses the Western philosophical perspective of Nietzsche to answer questions of Buddhist-conceived nirvana. Nietzsche's philosophy of will, expounded primarily through the Zarathustra essays, provides an active and affirmative alternative for understanding and attaining nirvana. His ideas of free will and will to power have commonalities with Buddhist practice and thought, including nonattachment, nihilism, no-self, and meditation. Nietzschean will revises the (...)
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  • Locke, Kierkegaard and the Phenomenology of Personal Identity.Patrick Stokes - 2008 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (5):645 – 672.
    Personal Identity theorists as diverse as Derek Parfit, Marya Schechtman and Galen Strawson have noted that the experiencing subject (the locus of present psychological experience) and the person (a human being with a career/narrative extended across time) are not necessarily coextensive. Accordingly, we can become psychologically alienated from, and fail to experience a sense of identity with, the person we once were or will be. This presents serious problems for Locke's original account of “sameness of consciousness” constituting personal identity, given (...)
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  • Emptiness: Interpretation and Metaphor.David E. Cooper - 2002 - Contemporary Buddhism 3 (1):7-20.
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  • Zen Apologetics: Reflections on Wright’sPhilosophical Meditations on Zen Buddhism.Jacques Fason - 2004 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (1):77-85.
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  • Panentheism and the Conception of the Ultimate in John B. Cobb’s Process Philosophy.Oliver Li - forthcoming - Sophia:1-13.
    The concept of ultimate reality has an important role in the metaphysics of religious pluralism. John B. Cobb—a process philosopher in the Whiteheadian tradition—has suggested not only two ultimates, like other process philosophers, but three ultimates: God, creativity, and the cosmos. Based on this, I argue, firstly, that Cobb’s tripartite conception of the ultimate offers greater conceptual resources for inter-religious dialog than, for example, John Hick’s conception of ultimate reality or ‘the Real’. In support of this first claim, I will (...)
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  • As habitações do humano como expressões do tempo: diálogo entre Heidegger e Dōgen.José Carlos Michelazzo - 2011 - Natureza Humana 13 (2):63-84.
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  • Philosophy of Doctrinal Classification: Kōyama Iwao and Mou Zongsan.Tomomi Asakura - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):453-468.
    Doctrinal classification or the panjiao 判教 system of Chinese Buddhism has been rediscovered and renewed in modern East Asian philosophy since both the Kyoto School and New Confucianism clarified the philosophical meaning of this intellectual tradition. The theoretical relation between these two modern reconsiderations, however, has not yet been studied. I analyze the theory of panjiao in Kōyama Iwao 高山岩男 and Mou Zongsan 牟宗三 so as to identify and extract, despite their apparent irrelevance, the same type of philosophical argument concerning (...)
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  • Uniting the Perspectival Subject: Two Approaches.Patrick Stokes - 2011 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):23-44.
    Visual forms of episodic memory and anticipatory imagination involve images that, by virtue of their perspectival organization, imply a notional subject of experience. But they contain no inbuilt reference to the actual subject, the person actually doing the remembering or imagining. This poses the problem of what (if anything) connects these two perspectival subjects and what differentiates cases of genuine memory and anticipation from mere imagined seeing. I consider two approaches to this problem. The first, exemplified by Wollheim and Velleman, (...)
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  • Being Time: Zen, Modernity, the Contemporary.James Adam Redfield - 2011 - Diogenes 58 (4):88-103.
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  • Śūnyatā and Kokoro: Science–Religion Dialogue in the Japanese Context.Seung Chul Kim - 2015 - Zygon 50 (1):155-171.
    When we read books or essays about the dialogue between “religion and science,” or when we attend conferences on the theme of “religion and science,” we cannot avoid the impression that they actually are dealing, almost without exception, not with a dialogue between “religion and science,” but with a dialogue between “Christianity and science.” This could easily be affirmed by looking at the major publications in this field. But how can the science–religion dialogue take place in a world where conventional (...)
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  • The Examination of Conditioned Entities and the Examination of Reality.Paul Nietupski - 1996 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 24 (2):103-143.
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  • Mature Contemplation.Charles D. Laughlin, John McManus & Eugene G. D'Aquili - 1993 - Zygon 28 (2):133-176.
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  • Education and Empty Relationality: Thoughts on Education and the Kyoto School of Philosophy.Anton Luis Sevilla - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4):639-654.
    This article builds on the growing literature on the Kyoto School of Philosophy and its influences on the field of Education. First, I argue that the influence of the Kyoto School of Philosophy is historically significant in Japan, and that the connection between this philosophical school and the philosophy of education is by no means superficial. Second, I suggest that this school contributes a unique view of ‘negative education’ founded in the philosophical idea of ‘nothingness’. I examine how this negative (...)
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  • A Philosophical Perspective of Contemporary Chinese Conceptual Art.John Zijiang Ding - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (4):445-468.
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  • Buddhist Thought and Nursing: A Hermeneutic Exploration.Graham McCaffrey, Shelley Raffin-Bouchal & Nancy J. Moules - 2012 - Nursing Philosophy 13 (2):87-97.
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  • Beyond Good and Evil? A Buddhist Critique of Nietzsche.David Loy - 1996 - Asian Philosophy 6 (1):37 – 57.
    Abstract In what ways was Nietzsche right, from a Buddhist perspective, and where did he go wrong? Nietzsche understood how the distinction we make between this world and a higher spiritual realm serves our need for security, and he saw the bad faith in religious values motivated by this need. He did not perceive how his alternative, more aristocratic values, also reflects the same anxiety. Nietzsche realised how the search for truth is motivated by a sublimated desire for symbolic security; (...)
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  • Mou Zongsan on Zen Buddhism.Chan Wing-Cheuk - 2005 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (1):73-88.
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