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  1. Narration as Argument.Paula Olmos (ed.) - 2017 - Springer Verlag.
    In this paper I explore the possibilities of acknowledging the argumentative character of narration. Two basic models will be revised: 1) primary narratives, regarding issues and facts under discussion, which may work as implicit arguments about the coincidence between discourse and reality via their own internal plausibility and 2) secondary narratives, imaginatively inserted in discourse, and serving as evidence for diverse lines of analogical or exemplary argumentation.
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  • The Social Nature of Argumentative Practices: The Philosophy of Argument and Audience Reception.Paula Olmos - 2018 - Informal Logic 38 (1):151-183.
    This article reviews Christopher W. Tindale’s The Philosophy of Argument and Audience Reception.
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  • The Authority of Citations and Quotations in Academic Papers.Begoña Carrascal - 2014 - Informal Logic 34 (2):167-191.
    I consider some uses of citations in academic writing and analyze them as instances of the “appeal to expert opinion” argumentative scheme to show that the critical questions commonly linked to this scheme are difficult to apply. I argue that, by considering citations as special communicative and argumentative situated acts, their use in real practice can be explained more adequately. Adaptation to the audience and to the social constraints is common and necessary in order to collaborate with others and to (...)
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  • Authority Arguments in Academic Contexts in Social Studies and Humanities.Begona Carrascal & Catherine E. Hundleby - unknown
    In academic contexts the appeal to authority is a quite common but seldom tested argument, either because we accept the authority without questioning it, or because we look for alternative experts or reasons to support a different point of view. But, by putting ourselves side by side an already accepted authority, we often rhetorically manoeuvre to displace the burden of the proof to avoid the fear to present our opinions and to allow face saving.
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  • Situated Practices of Testimony. A Rhetorical Approach.Paula Olmos - 2008 - Theoria : An International Journal for Theory, History and Fundations of Science 23 (1):57-68.
    Contrary to most current epistemologists who concentrate on core cases of rather ‘spontaneous’ trust and belief in the face of assertions, Classical rhetoricians addressed the study of ‘testimony’ as an two-acts phenomenon: that of the ‘disclosure’ of information and that of the ‘appeal’ to its authority in subsequent discursive practices. Moreover, they primarily focused on this second phase as they assumed that it was such argumentative setting that finally gave ‘testimonial’ relevance to the first act. According to this ‘rhetorical’ model, (...)
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