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  1. Hybrid Cultural Codes in Nonwestern Civil Society: Images of Women in Taiwan and Hong Kong.Ming-Cheng M. Lo & Yun Fan - 2010 - Sociological Theory 28 (2):167 - 192.
    Scholars have established that cultural codes and styles of expression in civil society must be recognized as informal mechanisms of exclusion, calling into question the possibility of the Habermasian normative ideal of the public sphere. This article joins theoretical discussions of how to remedy this problem. Going beyond Alexander's model of "multicultural incorporation" and borrowing from Sewell's theory of the duality of structure, we develop a theoretical framework of code hybridization to conceptualize how civil society participants achieve civil solidarity amid (...)
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  • Fairies and Fighters: Gendered Tactics of the Alter-Globalization Movement in Prague (2000) and Genoa.Marta Kolářová - 2009 - Feminist Review 92 (1):91-107.
    This paper examines gender aspects of tactics of the alter-globalization movement. Focusing mainly on two transnational collective actions in Prague in 2000 and in Genoa in 2001, the research draws on participant observation, interviews with activists and analysis of the movement's alternative media. The feminist activism within the movement, the gendered tactics and their representation in the alternative media are analysed using the concept of diffusion. Although feminists are involved in the protests, and local Czech feminist activism was incited by (...)
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  • Gendered Representations in Hawai‘I's Anti-Gmo Activism.Amanda Shaw - 2016 - Feminist Review 114 (1):48-71.
    The aim of this article is to analyse some of the representations of intersectional gender that materialise in activism against genetically modified organisms. It uses the case of Hawai'i as a key node in global transgenic seed production and hotspot for food, land and farming controversies. Based on ethnographic work conducted since 2012, the article suggests some of the ways that gender is represented within movements against GMOs by analysing activist media representations. The article shows how gender, understood intersectionally, informs (...)
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  • SWS 2015 Feminist Lecture: The Gendered Geographies of Struggle: The World Social Forum and Its Sometimes Overlapping Other Worlds.Manisha Desai - 2016 - Gender and Society 30 (6):869-889.
    The World Social Forum —a global gathering of social movements and a process of global change—has come to signify the global justice movements. Since its inception in 2001 in Brazil it has traveled across the Global South, with the 2016 WSF in Montreal. As the WSF has traveled across the world, it has reflected the particular geographies and histories of movement politics in each place. Yet everywhere it has demonstrated what I have called the gendered geographies of struggle. By gendered (...)
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  • Women's Anti-Imperialism, “The White Man's Burden,” and the Philippine-American War: Theorizing Masculinist Ambivalence in Protest.Erin L. Murphy - 2009 - Gender and Society 23 (2):244-270.
    During the Philippine-American War, the Anti-Imperialist League was the organizational vanguard of an anti-imperialist movement. Research on this period of U.S. imperialism has focused on empire building, ignoring the gendered activity of anti-imperialists in the metropole. The author outlines the constitutive relationship between gendered structures and experience that informed anti-imperialists' “contentious politics,” using archival sources of the Anti-Imperialist League and anti-imperialist debates in newspapers. The author shows how anti-imperialist leaders informally included women's monetary donations, labor, networks, and reputations while formally (...)
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  • Helping the “Neediest of the Needy”: An Intersectional Analysis of Moral-Identity Construction at a Community Health Clinic.Natalia Deeb-Sossa - 2007 - Gender and Society 21 (5):749-772.
    Drawing on data from 18 months of participant observation and interviews at a community health clinic in North Carolina, the author illustrates how an intersectional perspective deepens our understanding of the construction of a moral identity. In this case, the author examines the moral identity of health care providers—all women—who provide family planning and contraceptive counseling for women clients. The author analyzes how maternity care coordinators—two whites and two Latinas—craft a moral identity by drawing on the cultural toolkit available to (...)
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  • “You've Struck a Rock”: Comparing Gender, Social Movements, and Transformation in the United States and South Africa.M. Bahati Kuumba - 2002 - Gender and Society 16 (4):504-523.
    In the Montgomery bus boycott and the South African anti-pass campaign, women's autonomous organizations initiated actions that catalyzed the mass movements for racial justice and national liberation. The activism of women and their organizations sprang from their particular positioning within systems of multiple oppressions simultaneously experiencing racial/ethnic, class, and gender oppression. In both the United States and South Africa, the particular structural location and autonomous resistance of women of African descent was an important aspect of the political opportunity structure and (...)
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  • Women’s Political Engagement in a Mexican Sending Community: Migration as Crisis and the Struggle to Sustain an Alternative.Abigail Andrews - 2014 - Gender and Society 28 (4):583-608.
    Early research suggested that migration changed gender roles by offering women new wages and exposing them to norms of gender equity. Increasingly, however, scholars have drawn attention to the role of structural factors, such as poverty and undocumented status, in mediating the relationship between migration and gender. This article takes such insights a step further by showing that migrant communities’ reactions to structural marginality—and their efforts to build alternatives in their home villages—may also draw women into new gender roles. I (...)
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