Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Where the Design Argument Goes Wrong: Auxiliary Assumptions and Unification.Maarten Boudry & Bert Leuridan - 2011 - Philosophy of Science 78 (4):558-578.
    Sober has reconstructed the biological design argument in the framework of likelihoodism, purporting to demonstrate that it is defective for intrinsic reasons. We argue that Sober’s restriction on the introduction of auxiliary hypotheses is too restrictive, as it commits him to rejecting types of everyday reasoning that are clearly valid. Our account shows that the design argument fails, not because it is intrinsically untestable but because it clashes with the empirical evidence and fails to satisfy certain theoretical desiderata (in particular, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Instinto e razão na natureza humana, segundo Hume e Darwin.José Claudio Morelli Matos - 2007 - Scientiae Studia 5 (3):263-286.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Design and its Discontents.Bruce H. Weber - 2011 - Synthese 178 (2):271-289.
    The design argument was rebutted by David Hume. He argued that the world and its contents were not analogous to human artifacts. Hume further suggested that there were equally plausible alternatives to design to explain the organized complexity of the cosmos, such as random processes in multiple universes, or that matter could have inherent properties to self-organize, absent any external crafting. William Paley, writing after Hume, argued that the functional complexity of living beings, however, defied naturalistic explanations. In effect he (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Design and its Discontents.Bruce H. Weber - 2011 - Synthese 178 (2):271 - 289.
    The design argument was rebutted by David Hume. He argued that the world and its contents (such as organisms) were not analogous to human artifacts. Hume further suggested that there were equally plausible alternatives to design to explain the organized complexity of the cosmos, such as random processes in multiple universes, or that matter could have inherent properties to self-organize, absent any external crafting. William Paley, writing after Hume, argued that the functional complexity of living beings, however, defied naturalistic explanations. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Paley's Design Argument as an Inference to the Best Explanation, or, Dawkins' Dilemma.Sander Gliboff - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 31 (4):579-597.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Hume E o Argumento Do Desígnio.Marcos Rodrigues da Silva - 2006 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 47 (113).
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation