Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Spinoza on the Conditions That Nominally Define the Human Condition.Daniel Schneider - 2019 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 27 (5):753-773.
    ABSTRACTIn ‘Freedom of the Will and the Concept of a Person,’ Harry Frankfurt argues that a successful analysis of the concept ‘human’ must reveal something that distinguishes humans from non-human...
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Spinoza as Educator: From Eudaimonistic Ethics to an Empowering and Liberating Pedagogy.Nimrod Aloni - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (4):531-544.
    Although Spinoza's formative influence on the cultural ideals of the West is widely recognized, especially with reference to liberal democracy, secular humanism, and naturalistic ethics, little has been written about the educational implications of his philosophy. This article explores the pedagogical tenets that are implicit in Spinoza's writings. I argue that Spinoza's ethics is eudaimonistic, aiming at self‐affirmation, full humanity and wellbeing; that the flourishing of individuals depends on their personal resources, namely, their conatus, power, vitality or capacity to act (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Spinoza’s Actualist Model of Power.Valtteri Viljanen - 2009 - In Juhani Pietarinen & Valtteri Viljanen (eds.), The World as Active Power: Studies in the History of European Reason. Leiden: Brill. pp. 213–228.
    In addition to the notion of power (potentia), Spinoza employs the notion of power of acting (agendi potentia), especially in the Ethics. This raises the question, if Spinoza uses both ‘power’ and ‘power of acting’, what is the difference between the two? What else could power be, for Spinoza, but power of acting? What is the relationship between power and activity in his system? This essays aims at giving answers to these questions; thereby emerges what may be called an actualist (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Adequacy and Innateness in Spinoza.Eugene Marshall - 2008 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 4:51-88.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Spinoza on Civil Liberation.Justin Steinberg - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 35-58.
    In the final chapter of the Tractactus Theologico-Politicus , Spinoza declares that “the purpose of the state is, in reality, freedom.” While this remark obviously purports to tell us something important about Spinoza’s conception of the civitas , it is not clear exactly what is revealed. Recently, a number of scholars have interpreted this passage in a way that supports the view that Spinoza was a liberal for whom civic norms are rather more modest than the freedom of the Ethics (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Spinoza and Jeffers on Man in Nature.George Sessions - 1977 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 20 (1-4):481 – 528.
    Western society has been diverted from the goal of spiritual freedom and autonomy as expressed in the ancient Pythagorean 'theory of the cosmos'. Indeed, following Heidegger's analysis, it can be seen that modern Western society has arrived at the opposite pole of anthropocentric 'absolute subjectivism' in which the entire non-human world is seen as a material resource to be consumed in the satisfaction of our egoistic passive desires. It is further argued that Spinozism is actually a modern version of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations