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  1. Salvaging the Concept of Nudge: Table 1.Yashar Saghai - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (8):487-493.
    In recent years, ‘nudge’ theory has gained increasing attention for the design of population-wide health interventions. The concept of nudge puts a label on efficacious influences that preserve freedom of choice without engaging the influencees’ deliberative capacities. Given disagreements over what it takes genuinely to preserve freedom of choice, the question is whether health influences relying on automatic cognitive processes may preserve freedom of choice in a sufficiently robust sense to be serviceable for the moral evaluation of actions and policies. (...)
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  • Is Nutritional Advocacy Morally Indigestible? A Critical Analysis of the Scientific and Ethical Implications of 'Healthy' Food Choice Discourse in Liberal Societies.Christopher Mayes & Donald B. Thompson - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (2):158-169.
    Medical and non-medical experts increasingly argue that individuals, whether they are diagnosed with a specific chronic disease or condition or not (and whether they are judged at minimal risk of these consequences or not), have an obligation to make ‘healthy’ food choices. We argue that this obligation is neither scientifically nor ethically justified at the level of the individual. Our intent in the article is not simply to argue against moralization of the value of prudential uses of food for nutritional (...)
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  • The Role of Consent and Individual Autonomy in the PIP Breast Implant Scandal.B. Schofield - 2013 - Public Health Ethics 6 (2):220-223.
    The current scandal surrounds the global breast implant scare of silicone implants made by France's Poly Implant Prothese (PIP) Company. An ensuing review recognized that efforts in investigating the distress caused to so many women were hampered by a lack of reliable and comprehensive information about all the adverse incidents relating to PIP breast implants, as well as uncertainty about comparative data on similar products. One of the recommendations following the review was the investigation of the potential for re-establishing a (...)
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  • Can Republicanism Tame Public Health?Daniel Weinstock - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):125-133.
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  • Ethical Issues Evolving From Patients' Perspectives on Compulsory Screening for Syphilis and Voluntary Screening for Cervical Cancer in Kenya.Dickens S. Omondi Aduda & Nhlanhla Mkhize - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):27.
    Public health aims to provide universal safety and progressive opportunities to populations to realise their highest level of health through prevention of disease, its progression or transmission. Screening asymptomatic individuals to detect early unapparent conditions is an important public health intervention strategy. It may be designed to be compulsory or voluntary depending on the epidemiological characteristics of the disease. Integrated screening, including for both syphilis and cancer of the cervix, is a core component of the national reproductive health program in (...)
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  • Social Practices, Public Health and the Twin Aims of Justice: Responses to Comments.Madison Powers & Ruth Faden - 2013 - Public Health Ethics 6 (1):45-49.
    Articles by Lyn Horn and Alison Thompson highlight several points crucial to understanding how our theory figures in wider debates about social justice as well as the particular relevance of our theory for assessing the overall practice of public health (Horn, 2013; Thompson, 2013). We begin with these two articles, first to respond to and concur with many of their central points, and second to set the stage for dealing more efficiently with some points raised in the other articles.
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  • The Concept of Nudge and its Moral Significance: A Reply to Ashcroft, Bovens, Dworkin, Welch, and Wertheimer.Yashar Saghai - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (8):2012-101112.
    I warmly thank Richard Ashcroft, Luc Bovens, Gerald Dworkin, Brynn Welch, and Alan Wertheimer for their insightful comments on my article. As I do not have the space to discuss all the questions they raise, I will focus on four concerns that run through my commentators’ responses...
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  • Behavior Change or Empowerment: On the Ethics of Health-Promotion Strategies. [REVIEW]P. -A. Tengland - 2012 - Public Health Ethics 5 (2):140-153.
    There are several strategies to promote health in individuals and populations. Two general approaches to health promotion are behavior change and empowerment. The aim of this article is to present those two kinds of strategies, and show that the behavior-change approach has some moral problems, problems that the empowerment approach (on the whole) is better at handling. Two distinct ‘ideal types’ of these practices are presented and scrutinized. Behavior change interventions use various kinds of theories to target people’s behavior, which (...)
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  • Disadvantage, Social Justice and Paternalism.A. M. Viens - 2013 - Public Health Ethics 6 (1):28-34.
    While Powers and Faden do not consider possible anti-paternalism objections to their view, there are two variants of this objection that a social justice perspective is susceptible to. It is worth exploring which responses to such objections may be less promising than others. It is argued that for most public health measures targeting the disadvantaged, theorists and practitioners taking a social justice perspective should bite the paternalist bullet. Insofar as the government has the ability to reduce mortality and morbidity within (...)
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  • The Evolution of Public Health Ethics Frameworks: Systematic Review of Moral Values and Norms in Public Health Policy.Mahmoud Abbasi, Reza Majdzadeh, Alireza Zali, Abbas Karimi & Forouzan Akrami - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (3):387-402.
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  • The Subversion of Mill and the Ultimate Aim of Nursing.Paul C. Snelling - 2018 - Nursing Philosophy 19 (1):e12201.
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  • Obesity, Liberty and Public Health Emergencies.Jonathan Herington, Angus Dawson & Heather Draper - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (6):26-35.
    Widespread obesity poses a serious challenge to health outcomes in the developed world and is a growing problem in the developing world. There has been a raft of proposals to combat the challenge of obesity, including restrictions on the nature of food advertising, the content of prepared meals, and the size of sodas; taxes on saturated fat and on calories; and mandated “healthy-options” on restaurant menus. Many of these interventions seem to have a greater impact on rates of obesity than (...)
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  • Response to Open Peer Commentaries on ‘‘In Defense of ‘Denial’: Difficulty Knowing When Beliefs Are Unrealistic and Whether Unrealistic Beliefs Are Bad”.J. S. Blumenthal-Barby & Peter A. Ubel - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (9):3-5.
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