Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Metaethics as Dead Politics? On Political Normativity and Justification.Ben Cross - 2024 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 27 (3):319-335.
    Many political realists endorse some notion of political normativity. They think that there are certain normative claims about politics that do not depend on moral premises. The most prominent moralist objections to political normativity have been metaethical: specifically, that political normativity is not genuinely normative; and that it is incapable of justifying normative claims. In this article, I criticize the latter metaethical objection. I argue that the objection presupposes a notion of ‘justification’ that renders it something that is no longer (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A genealogy of politics: Vindicatory, pragmatic, and realist.Carlo Burelli & Janosch Prinz - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    In Western democracies, people harbor feelings of disgust or hatred for politics. Populists and technocrats even seemingly question the value of politics. Populists cry that they are not politicians and that politics is necessarily corrupt. From the opposite side, technocrats view politics as a pointless constraint on enacting the obviously right policies. Are Western democracies facing a rejection of politics? And is politics worth defending? This paper offers a vindicatory genealogy of politics, vindicating the need human beings have for this (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • From right to might, and back: Functional legitimacy as a realist value.Carlo Burelli & Chiara Destri - forthcoming - Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    For political realists, legitimacy is a central requirement for the desirability of political institutions. Their detractors contend that it is either descriptive, and thus devoid of critical potential, or it relies on some moralist value that realists reject. We defend a functionalist reading of realist legitimacy: descriptive legitimacy, that is, the capacity of a political institution to generate beliefs in its right to rule as opposed to commanding through coercion alone, is desirable in virtue of its functional role. First, descriptive (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark