Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Deflating the Deep Brain Stimulation Causes Personality Changes Bubble: The Authors Reply.Frederic Gilbert, John Noel M. Viana & C. Ineichen - 2020 - Neuroethics 14 (Suppl 1):125-136.
    To conclude that there is enough or not enough evidence demonstrating that deep brain stimulation causes unintended postoperative personality changes is an epistemic problem that should be answered on the basis of established, replicable, and valid data. If prospective DBS recipients delay or refuse to be implanted because they are afraid of suffering from personality changes following DBS, and their fears are based on unsubstantiated claims made in the neuroethics literature, then researchers making these claims bear great responsibility for prospective (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Authenticity of Machine-Augmented Human Intelligence: Therapy, Enhancement, and the Extended Mind.Allen Coin & Veljko Dubljević - 2020 - Neuroethics 14 (2):283-290.
    Ethical analyses of biomedical human enhancement often consider the issue of authenticity — to what degree can the accomplishments of those utilizing biomedical enhancements be considered authentic or worthy of praise? As research into Brain-Computer Interface technology progresses, it may soon be feasible to create a BCI device that enhances or augments natural human intelligence through some invasive or noninvasive biomedical means. In this article we will review currently existing BCI technologies and to what extent these can be said to (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Incoming Ethical Issues for Deep Brain Stimulation: When Long-Term Treatment Leads to a ‘New Form of the Disease’.Frederic Gilbert & Mathilde Lancelot - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (1):20-25.
    Deep brain stimulation has been regarded as an efficient and safe treatment for Parkinson’s disease since being approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1997. It is estimated that more than 150 000 patients have been implanted, with a forecasted rapid increase in uptake with population ageing. Recent longitudinal follow-up studies have reported a significant increase in postoperative survival rates of patients with PD implanted with DBS as compared with those not implanted with DBS. Although DBS tends to increase (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation