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  1. “It Just Went Wrong, as Bodies Are Prone to Do”: Graphic Medicine and the Trauma of Miscarriage.Sathyaraj Venkatesan & Chinmay Murali - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities:1-13.
    The conspicuous absence of personal articulations of miscarriage in mainstream discourses attests to the stigmatised nature of the experience. Notably, there exists a growing body of infertility comics which foreground the authors’ lived realities of miscarriage. In a close reading of select graphic memoirs such as Jenell Johnson’s Present/Perfect, Paula Knight’s The Facts of Life, Phoebe Potts’ Good Eggs, and Diane Noomin’s Baby Talk, this article examines how the authors use comics to foreground their predicament. In so doing, the essay (...)
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  • It's Complicated: What Our Attitudes Toward Pregnancy, Abortion, and Miscarriage Tell Us About the Moral Status of Early Fetuses.K. Lindsey Chambers - forthcoming - Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    Many accounts of the morality of abortion assume that early fetuses must all have or lack moral status in virtue of developmental features that they share. Our actual attitudes toward early fetuses don’t reflect this all-or-nothing assumption: early fetuses can elicit feelings of joy, love, indifference, or distress. If we start with the assumption that our attitudes toward fetuses reflect a real difference in their moral status, then we need an account of fetal moral status that can explain that difference. (...)
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  • Relationality and Life: Phenomenological Reflections on Miscarriage.J. Lenore Wright - 2018 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (2):135-156.
    Feminist philosophers familiar with the work of Helen Marshall will recall her wonderfully witty reflections on pregnancy in "Our Bodies, Ourselves: Why We Should Add Old-Fashioned Empirical Phenomenology to the New Theories of the Body."1 Her text is laden with amusing metaphors of the pregnant body—"a little teapot " —and rich analyses of the corporeal dimensions of pregnancy. Marshall maintains that the experience of pregnancy is not, as we might believe, a unified experience; rather, it is more like a self (...)
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