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  1. “It just went wrong, as bodies are prone to do”: Graphic Medicine and the Trauma of Miscarriage.Sathyaraj Venkatesan & Chinmay Murali - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (4):763-775.
    The conspicuous absence of personal articulations of miscarriage in mainstream discourses attests to the stigmatised nature of the experience. Notably, there exists a growing body of infertility comics which foreground the authors’ lived realities of miscarriage. In a close reading of select graphic memoirs such as Jenell Johnson’s Present/perfect, Paula Knight’s The Facts of Life, Phoebe Potts’ Good Eggs, and Diane Noomin’s Baby Talk, this article examines how the authors use comics to foreground their predicament. In so doing, the essay (...)
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  • Relationality and Life: Phenomenological Reflections on Miscarriage.J. Lenore Wright - 2018 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (2):135-156.
    In this essay, I analyze pregnancy loss from a feminist phenomenological perspective. I draw upon relational accounts of personhood wherein a person's status and identity are formed through a lived history and the activity of “calling into personhood” a being a woman may seek to know or become. I draw upon the work of Simone de Beauvoir, who advances a feminist phenomenology that grounds the status and identity of women within embodied situations. Her important work sheds light on the varied (...)
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  • It’s Complicated: What Our Attitudes toward Pregnancy, Abortion, and Miscarriage Tell Us about the Moral Status of Early Fetuses.K. Lindsey Chambers - 2020 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 50 (8):950-965.
    Many accounts of the morality of abortion assume that early fetuses must all have or lack moral status in virtue of developmental features that they share. Our actual attitudes toward early fetuses don’t reflect this all-or-nothing assumption: early fetuses can elicit feelings of joy, love, indifference, or distress. If we start with the assumption that our attitudes toward fetuses reflect a real difference in their moral status, then we need an account of fetal moral status that can explain that difference. (...)
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  • A Pregnant Pause: Pregnancy, Miscarriage, and Suspended Time.Victoria Browne - 2022 - Hypatia 37 (2):447-468.
    This article takes the rupturing of normative, linear, reproductive time that occurs in the event of miscarriage as a potentially generative philosophical moment—a catalyst to rethink pregnancy aside from the expectation of child-production. Pregnant time is usually imagined as a linear passage toward birth. Accordingly, the one who “miscarries” appears as suspended within an arrested journey that never arrived at its destination, or indeed, as ejected from pregnant time altogether. But here I propose to rethink both pregnancy and miscarriage through (...)
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  • When Words Fail: “Miscarriage,” Referential Ambiguity, and Psychological Harm.Jessalyn A. Bohn - 2023 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 48 (3):265-282.
    Despite significant efforts to support those bereaved by intrauterine death, they remain susceptible to avoidable psychological harm such as disenfranchised grief, misplaced guilt, and emotional shock. This is in part because the words available to describe intrauterine death—“miscarriage,” “spontaneous abortion,” and “pregnancy loss”—are referentially ambiguous. Despite appearing to refer to one event, they can refer to two distinct events: the baby’s death and his preterm delivery. Disenfranchised grief increases when people understand “miscarriage” as the physical process of preterm delivery alone, (...)
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