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  1. Gilles Deleuze and Michel Henry: Critical Contrasts in the Deduction of Life as Transcendental.James Williams - 2008 - Sophia 47 (3):265-279.
    To address the theological turn in phenomenology, this paper sets out critical arguments opposing the theist phenomenology of Michel Henry and Gilles Deleuze’s philosophy of the event. Henry’s phenomenology has been overlooked in recent commentaries compared with, for example, Jean-Luc Marion’s work. It will be shown here that Henry’s philosophy presents a detailed novel turn in phenomenology structured according to critical moves against positions developed from Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. This demonstration is done through a strong contrast with Deleuze and (...)
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  • Wounds and Scars: Deleuze on the Time (and the Ethics) of the Event.Jack Reynolds - 2007 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 1 (2):15.
    This essay examines Deleuze's account of time and the wound in The Logic of Sense and, to a lesser extent, in Difference and Repetition. As such, it will also explicate his understanding of the event, as well as the notoriously opaque ethics of counter-actualisation that are bound up with it, before raising certain problems that are associated with the transcendental and ethical priority that he accords to the event and what he calls the time of Aion. I will conclude by (...)
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  • Wounds and Scars: Deleuze on the Time and Ethics of the Event.Jack Reynolds - 2007 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 1 (2):144-166.
    This paper explores the idea that Deleuze’s oeuvre is best understood as a philosophy of the wound, synonymous with a philosophy of the event. Although this wound/scar typology may appear to be a metaphorical conceit, the motif of the wound recurs frequently and perhaps even symptomatically in many of Deleuze’s texts, particularly where he is attempting to delineate some of the most important differences (transcendental, temporal, and ethical) between himself and his phenomenological predecessors. I raise some some potential problems for (...)
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