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  1. Tensions Entre la Liberté Et L’Égalité Dans le Discours Sur la Liberté de Penser D’Anthony Collins.Kim Noisette - 2015 - Dialogue 54 (1):91-119.
    LeDiscours sur la liberté de penser d’Anthony Collins revendique un droit égal, pour chaque être humain, d’examiner librement toute proposition. Pour autant, ce droit n’est pas très clair et Collins en défend successivement trois versions, donnant un rôle plus ou moins large à l’égalité. La tension entre la liberté revendiquée et une égalité dont la place varie va en s’accroissant au fil duDiscours. Il s’agit d’un exemple de développement encore embryonnaire d’une problématique qui, au fil du XVIIIesiècle, prendra une importance (...)
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  • Hume and Vital Materialism.Catherine Wilson - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (5):1002-1021.
    ABSTRACTHume was not a philosopher famed for what are sometimes called ‘ontological commitments'. Nevertheless, few contemporary scholars doubt that Hume was an atheist, and the present essay tenders the view that Hume was favourably disposed to the 'vital materialism' of post-Newtonian natural philosophers in England, Scotland and France. Both internalist arguments, collating passages from a range of Hume's works, and externalist arguments, reviewing the likely sources of his knowledge of ancient materialism and his association with his materialistic contemporaries are employed.
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  • Anthony Collins on the Emergence of Consciousness and Personal Identity.William Uzgalis - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (2):363-379.
    The correspondence between Samuel Clarke and Anthony Collins of 1706–8, while not well known, is a spectacularly good debate between a dualist and a materialist over the possibility of giving a materialist account of consciousness and personal identity. This article puts the Clarke Collins Correspondence in a broader context in which it can be better appreciated, noting that it is really a debate between John Locke and Anthony Collins on one hand, and Samuel Clarke and Joseph Butler on the other. (...)
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