Switch to: References

Citations of:

Ritual and Rightness in the Analects

In Amy Olberding (ed.), Dao Companion to the Analects. pp. 95-116 (2013)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. It’s Not Them, It’s You: A Case Study Concerning the Exclusion of Non-Western Philosophy.Amy Olberding - 2015 - Comparative Philosophy 6 (2).
    My purpose in this essay is to suggest, via case study, that if Anglo-American philosophy is to become more inclusive of non-western traditions, the discipline requires far greater efforts at self-scrutiny. I begin with the premise that Confucian ethical treatments of manners afford unique and distinctive arguments from which moral philosophy might profit, then seek to show why receptivity to these arguments will be low. I examine how ordinary good manners have largely fallen out of philosophical moral discourse in the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Care Ethics and Confucianism: Caring Through Li.Kelly M. Epley - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (4):881-896.
    The role of li, or ritual, in Confucianism is a perceived impediment to interpreting Confucianism to share a similar ethical framework with care ethics because care ethics is a form of moral particularism. I argue that this perception is false. The form of moral particularism promoted by care ethicists does not entail the abandonment of social conventions such as li. On the contrary, providing good care often requires employing systems of readily recognizable norms in order to ensure that care is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Etiquette: A Confucian Contribution to Moral Philosophy.Amy Olberding - 2016 - Ethics 126 (2):422-446.
    The early Confucians recognize that the exchanges and experiences of quotidian life profoundly shape moral attitudes, moral self-understanding, and our prospects for robust moral community. Confucian etiquette aims to provide a form of moral training that can render learners equal to the moral work of ordinary life, inculcating appropriate cognitive-emotional dispositions, as well as honing social perception and bodily expression. In both their astute attention to prosaic behavior and the techniques they suggest for managing it, I argue, the Confucians afford (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Philosophy Within its Proper Bounds.Edouard Machery - 2017 - Oxford University Press.
    In Philosophy Within Its Proper Bounds, Edouard Machery argues that resolving many traditional and contemporary philosophical issues is beyond our epistemic reach and that philosophy should re-orient itself toward more humble, but ultimately more important intellectual endeavors, such as the analysis of concepts.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • Li (Ritual) in Early Confucianism.Thomas Radice - 2017 - Philosophy Compass 12 (10):e12463.
    Li 禮 (translated variously as “ritual”, “etiquette”, or “propriety”) plays a central role in early Confucianism, but its complexity is not always fully understood. At first glance, it may seem as if li behaviors are merely attempts to promote conservative practices from the idealized Chinese past. However, by examining the nature and function of li, as described the Analects (Lunyu 論語) and the Xunzi 荀子 (two key texts in the early Confucian tradition), it becomes overwhelmingly apparent that li is a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Role of Human Nature in Moral Inqiury: MacIntyre, Mencius, and Xunzi.Richard Kim - 2015 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 32 (4):313-333.
    Appeals to human nature in normative inquiry have fallen out of favor among contemporary philosophers. There are a variety of reasons frequently cited by those who see appeals to human nature as deeply problematic: (a) that the notion of human nature, which conceives nature as having a teleological direction, is incompatible with evolutionary biology; (b) that the manifest diversity of cultural values and traditions falsify any essentialist claims involving a common nature necessarily shared by all humans; (c) that appeals to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Dao Admits of No Admixture: Mysticism and Moral Realism in Zhuangzi’s Writings.Joseph Emmanuel Sta Maria - 2018 - Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 22 (1):43-84.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Three Streams: Confucian Reflections on Learning and the Moral Heart-Mind in China, Korea, and Japan.Philip J. Ivanhoe - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Recent interest in Confucianism has a tendency to suffer from essentialism and idealism, manifested in a variety of ways. One example is to think of Confucianism in terms of the views attributed to one representative of the tradition, such as Kongzi or Mengzi or one school or strand of the tradition, most often the strand or tradition associated with Mengzi or, in the later tradition, that formed around the commentaries and interpretation of Zhu Xi. Another such tendency is to think (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • A Sensible Confucian Perspective on Abortion.Amy Olberding - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (2):235-253.
    Confucian resources for moral discourse and public policy concerning abortion have potential to broaden the prevailing forms of debate in Western societies. However, what form a Confucian contribution might take is itself debatable. This essay provides a critique of Philip J. Ivanhoe’s recent proposal for a Confucian account of abortion. I contend that Ivanhoe’s approach is neither particularly Confucian, nor viable as effective and humane public policy. Affirmatively, I argue that a Confucian approach to abortion will assiduously root moral consideration (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations