Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Moral Obligations in Conditions of Partial Compliance.Violetta Igneski - forthcoming - Journal of Value Inquiry:1-17.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Climate Change and Individual Duties.Augustin Fragnière - 2016 - Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews.
    Tackling climate change has often been considered the responsibility of national governments. But do individuals also have a duty to act in the face of this problem? In particular, do they have a duty to adopt a greener lifestyle or to press their government to act? This review critically examines the arguments provided for and against such duties in the relevant philosophic literature. It first discusses the problem of causal inefficacy—namely the fact that individual greenhouse gas emissions appear to make (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • What is Wrong with Nimbys? Renewable Energy, Landscape Impacts and Incommensurable Values.Anne Schwenkenbecher - 2017 - Environmental Values 26 (6):711-732.
    Local opposition to infrastructure projects implementing renewable energy (RE) such as wind farms is often strong even if state-wide support for RE is strikingly high. The slogan “Not In My BackYard” (NIMBY) has become synonymous for this kind of protest. This paper revisits the question of what is wrong with NIMBYs about RE projects and how to best address them. I will argue that local opponents to wind farm (and other RE) developments do not necessarily fail to contribute their fair (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Renewable Energy.Anne Schwenkenbecher & Martin Brueckner - 2016 - In Benjamin Hale & Andrew Light (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Environmental Ethics. Routledge. pp. 359-373.
    There exist overwhelming – and morally compelling – reasons for shifting to renewable energy (RE), because only that will enable us to timely mitigate dangerous global warming. In addition, several other morally weighty reasons speak in favor of the shift: considerable public health benefits, broader environmental benefits, the potential for sustainable and equitable economic development and equitable energy access, and, finally, long-term energy security. Furthermore, it appears that the transition to RE is economically, technologically, and politically feasible at this point (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark