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  1. Exploiting Injustice in Mutually Beneficial Market Exchange: The Case of Sweatshop Labor.András Miklós - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (1):59-69.
    Mutually beneficial exchanges in markets can be exploitative because one party takes advantage of an underlying injustice. For instance, employers of sweatshop workers are often accused of exploiting the desperate conditions of their employees, although the latter accept the terms of their employment voluntarily. A weakness of this account of exploitation is its tendency for over-inclusiveness. Certainly, given the prevalence of global and domestic socioeconomic inequalities, not all exchanges that take place against background injustices should be considered exploitative. This paper (...)
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  • How Do Large Purchasing Organizations Treat Their Diverse Suppliers? Minority Business Enterprise CEOs’ Perception of Corporate Commitment to Supplier Diversity.Ian Y. Blount - 2021 - Business and Society 60 (7):1708-1737.
    Supplier diversity programs were created in the United States nearly 50 years ago to encourage private sector companies to provide business opportunities to underutilized minority business enterprises. In order to assess the experiences that minority business enterprise CEOs have with large purchasing organizations and their perceptions of justice and commitment of large purchasing organizations to the buyer–supplier relationship, this study utilizes survey data collected from 206 minority business enterprise CEOs who supply large purchasing organizations that espouse a strong commitment to (...)
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  • Ethical Purchasing Dissonance: Antecedents and Coping Behaviors.Tim Reilly, Amit Saini & Jenifer Skiba - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (3):577-597.
    The pressure of oversight and scrutiny in the business-to-business purchasing process has the potential to cause psychological distress in purchasing professionals, giving rise to apprehensions about being ethically inappropriate. Utilizing depth interviews with public sector purchasing professionals in a phenomenological approach, the authors develop the notion of ethical purchasing dissonance to explain the psychological distress. An inductively derived conceptual framework is presented for ethical purchasing dissonance that explores its potential antecedents and consequences; illustrative propositions are presented, and managerial implications are (...)
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  • Balancing the Scales of Justice: Do Perceptions of Buyers’ Justice Drive Suppliers’ Social Performance?Mohammad Alghababsheh, David Gallear & Mushfiqur Rahman - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (1):125-150.
    A major challenge for supply chain managers is how to manage sourcing relationships to ensure reliable and predictable actions of distant suppliers. The extant research into sustainable supply chain management has traditionally focused on the transactional and collaboration approaches through which buyers encourage suppliers to act responsibly. However, little effort has been devoted to investigating the factors that underpin and enable effective implementation of these two approaches, or to exploring alternative approaches to help sustain an acceptable level of social performance (...)
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  • Power Imbalance and the Dark Side of the Captive Agri-Food Supplier–Buyer Relationship.Richard Glavee-Geo, Per Engelseth & Arnt Buvik - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    This paper highlights the dark side of power imbalance regarding its consequences in agri-food supplier–buyer relationships. We report on findings from two studies. The first study is based on a sample of 105 key informants, while study 2 is based on a sample of 444 key informants, all from the cocoa agri-food supply market of Ghana. While the first study focuses on the antecedents of power imbalance and its consequences, the second study explores the role of cooperatives/collective action in minimizing (...)
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  • Food Waste, Power, and Corporate Social Responsibility in the Australian Food Supply Chain.Bree Devin & Carol Richards - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (1):199-210.
    By examining corporate social responsibility and power within the context of the food supply chain, this paper illustrates how food retailers claim to address food waste while simultaneously setting standards that result in the large-scale rejection of edible food on cosmetic grounds. Specifically, this paper considers the powerful role of food retailers and how they may be considered to be legitimately engaging in socially responsible behaviors to lower food waste, yet implement practices that ultimately contribute to higher levels of food (...)
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  • Conflict Minerals and Supply Chain Due Diligence: An Exploratory Study of Multi-Tier Supply Chains.Hannes Hofmann, Martin C. Schleper & Constantin Blome - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (1):115-141.
    As recently stakeholders complain about the use of conflict minerals in consumer products that are often invisible to them in final products, firms across industries implement conflict mineral management practices. Conflict minerals are those, whose systemic exploitation and trade contribute to human right violations in the country of extraction and surrounding areas. Particularly, supply chain managers in the Western world are challenged taking reasonable steps to identify and prevent risks associated with these resources due to the globally dispersed nature of (...)
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