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  1. Who Are the Users of Synthetic DNA? Using Metaphors to Activate Microorganisms at the Center of Synthetic Biology.Erika Amethyst Szymanski - 2018 - Life Sciences, Society and Policy 14 (1):1-16.
    Synthetic biology, a multidisciplinary field involving designing and building with DNA, often designs and builds in microorganisms. The role of these microorganisms tends to be understood through metaphors making the microbial cell like a machine and emphasizing its passivity: cells are described as platforms, chassis, and computers. Here, I point to the efficacy of such metaphors in enacting the microorganism as a particular kind of participant in the research process, and I suggest the utility of employing metaphors that make microorganisms (...)
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  • From Quorum to Cooperation: Lessons From Bacterial Sociality for Evolutionary Theory.Pamela Lyon - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 38 (4):820-833.
    Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.
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  • Philosophy and the Microbe: A Balancing Act. [REVIEW]Maureen A. O’Malley - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (2):153-159.
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  • Why Biology is Beyond Physical Sciences?Bhakti Niskama Shanta & Bhakti Vijnana Muni - 2016 - Advances in Life Sciences 6 (1):13-30.
    In the framework of materialism, the major attention is to find general organizational laws stimulated by physical sciences, ignoring the uniqueness of Life. The main goal of materialism is to reduce consciousness to natural processes, which in turn can be translated into the language of math, physics and chemistry. Following this approach, scientists have made several attempts to deny the living organism of its veracity as an immortal soul, in favor of genes, molecules, atoms and so on. However, advancement in (...)
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  • Natural Agency: The Case of Bacterial Cognition.Fermín C. Fulda - 2017 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 3 (1):69-90.
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  • Autopoietic Enactivism, Phenomenology and the Deep Continuity Between Life and Mind.Paulo De Jesus - 2016 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (2):265-289.
    In their recent book Radicalizing Enactivism. Basic minds without content, Dan Hutto and Erik Myin make two important criticisms of what they call autopoietic enactivism. These two criticisms are that AE harbours tacit representationalists commitments and that it has too liberal a conception of cognition. Taking the latter claim as its main focus, this paper explores the theoretical underpinnings of AE in order to tease out how it might respond to H&M. In so doing it uncovers some reasons which not (...)
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  • Environmental Complexity, Adaptability and Bacterial Cognition: Godfrey-Smith’s Hypothesis Under the Microscope.Pamela Lyon - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (3):443-465.
    The paper presents evidence in bacteria for the utility of Godfrey-Smith’s environmental complexity thesis, using certain kinds of signal transduction systems as proxies for cognitive/behavioral complexity. Microbiologists already accept that the number of signal transduction proteins in a bacterial genome indicates the level of ecological complexity to which the organism is subject: the more signalling proteins, the greater the complexity. Sheer numbers are not always a reliable indicator of behavioral complexity, however. The paper proposes a new, ECT-based procedure for identifying, (...)
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  • From Quorum to Cooperation: Lessons From Bacterial Sociality for Evolutionary Theory.Pamela Lyon - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 38 (4):820-833.
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