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  1. Is affirmative action racist? Reflections toward a theory of institutional racism.César Cabezas - 2022 - Journal of Social Philosophy 54 (2):218-235.
    I defend impact-based accounts of institutional racism against the criticism that they are over-inclusive. If having a negative impact on non-whites suffices to make an institution racist, too many institutions (including institutions whose affirmative action policies inadvertently harm its intended beneficiaries) would count as racist. To address this challenge, I consider a further necessary condition for these institutions to count as racist—they must stand in a particular relation to racist ideology. I argue that, on the impact-based model, institutions are racist (...)
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  • On the margins: personhood and moral status in marginal cases of human rights.Helen Ryland - 2020 - Dissertation, University of Birmingham
    Most philosophical accounts of human rights accept that all persons have human rights. Typically, ‘personhood’ is understood as unitary and binary. It is unitary because there is generally supposed to be a single threshold property required for personhood. It is binary because it is all-or-nothing: you are either a person or you are not. A difficulty with binary views is that there will typically be subjects, like children and those with dementia, who do not meet the threshold, and so who (...)
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  • Settler Shame: A Critique of the Role of Shame in Settler–Indigenous Relationships in Canada.Sarah Kizuk - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (1):161-177.
    This article both defines and shows the limits of settler shame for achieving decolonialized justice. It discusses the work settler shame does in “healing” the nation and delivering Canadians into a new sense of pride, thus maintaining the myth of the peacekeeping Canadian. This kind of shame does so, somewhat paradoxically, by making people feel good about feeling bad. Thus, the contiguous relationship of shame and recognition in a settler colonial context produces a form of pernicious self-recognition. Drawing on the (...)
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  • Racism and “Self-Love”: The Case of White Nationalism.Michael J. Monahan - 2021 - Critical Philosophy of Race 9 (1):1-15.
    The rise in the public profile of “alt-right” and “white nationalist” groups in recent years is often described as a rise in “hate groups.” The presumption in this nomenclature is that these sorts of groups are defined essentially in terms of their shared hatred for some or all nonwhite individuals and groups. However, the rhetoric of such groups is couched not as hatred, but rather in terms of “self-love”—they do not hate other groups, they are just looking out for themselves. (...)
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  • Looking Through Whiteness: Objectivity, Racism, Method, and Responsibility.Philip Mack - unknown
    Does a white philosopher have anything of value to offer to the philosophy of race and racism? If this philosophical subfield must embrace subjective experience, why should we value the perspective of white philosophers whose racial identity is often occluded by racial normativity and who lack substantive experiences of being on the receiving end of racism? Further, if we should be committed to experience, in what sense can the philosophy of race and racism be “objective”? What should that word mean?Tackling (...)
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  • On “Ur-Contempt” and the Maintenance of Racial Injustice: A Response to Monahan's “Racism and ‘Self-Love’: The Case of White Nationalism”.Grant J. Silva - 2021 - Critical Philosophy of Race 9 (1):16-26.
    This article offers a response to Michael J. Monahan's engagement with and criticism of Grant Silva's article “Racism as Self-Love.” So as to demonstrate how Monahan's idea of “ur-contempt” fits alongside the author's project and supplements his attempt to challenge the variety of forms of moral obfuscation employed by white nationalists and other racists today, this response begins with an overview of the central critique of moral responsibility for racism that Silva's work offers. At stake is the attempt, by unabashed (...)
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  • A paradigm shift in normative political theory: grappling with Mills’s the racial contract 25 Years Later.Elvira Basevich - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (1):1-8.
    The late Charles W. Mills achieved public renown in North America and around the world that academics seldom achieve. His untimely death from cancer in 2021 was reported by The New York Times, Nati...
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  • Reply to My Critics: (Re-)Defining Racism: A Philosophical Analysis.Alberto G. Urquidez - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 24 (3):679-698.
    In Defining Racism, I offer the first comprehensive examination of the philosophical literature on racism and argue for a new methodological approach that I call conventionalism. Framing my argument within this approach, I defend an oppression theory of racism. In this article, I will attempt to accomplish two goals: offer a reply to the thoughtful comments of my critics, and lay out the main argument and major themes of my book in an accessible manner. First, I will describe the philosophical (...)
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  • Prejudice as Viciousness: Marie de Gournay and Anton Wilhelm Amo.Allauren Samantha Forbes - 2023 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 61 (1):182-205.
    Marie de Gournay and Anton Wilhelm Amo, though thinking and writing in different social contexts, each offer an account of prejudice which bears a deep philosophical resonance to that of the other. This resonance is striking and mutually illuminating: Gournay and Amo develop a view of prejudice as a kind of epistemic and moral viciousness that damages both the prejudicial person and their socio-epistemic neighbors. Their accounts highlight how agents are rightly held responsible for prejudice, as it is the agents' (...)
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