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  1. Philosophical Arguments, Historical Contexts, and Theory of Education.Daniel Tröhler - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (1):10–19.
    This paper argues that many philosophical arguments within the education discourse are too little embedded in their own historical contexts. Starting out from the obvious fact that philosophers of education use sources from the past, the paper asks how we can deal with the arguments that these sources contain. The general attitude within philosophy of education, which views arguments as timeless, is being challenged by the insight that arguments always depend upon their own contexts. For this reason, citing past authors, (...)
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  • Poetics of the Encyclopaedia: Knowledge, Pedagogy and Research Today.Soyoung Lee - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 54 (5):1237-1259.
    Journal of Philosophy of Education, EarlyView.
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  • A Critique of Positive Psychology—or 'the New Science of Happiness'.Alistair Miller - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (3-4):591-608.
    This paper argues that the new science of positive psychology is founded on a whole series of fallacious arguments; these involve circular reasoning, tautology, failure to clearly define or properly apply terms, the identification of causal relations where none exist, and unjustified generalisation. Instead of demonstrating that positive attitudes explain achievement, success, well-being and happiness, positive psychology merely associates mental health with a particular personality type: a cheerful, outgoing, goal-driven, status-seeking extravert.
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  • Places, Spaces, Holes for Knowing and Writing the Earth: The Geography Curriculum and Derrida's Khôra.Christine Winter - 2009 - Ethics and Education 4 (1):57-68.
    This article enquires into the value of 'concepts' as a framework for the school curriculum by questioning their contribution towards our responsibilities for thinking about the earth. I take Derrida's deconstructive reading of Plato's Timaeus to show how spaces in meaning can be revealed, and more transgressive ways of knowing invited in. Derrida's Kh ra marks the opportunity for something new, productive and unforeseeable to arise as the play of traces unfurls. A deconstructive reading of the geography national curriculum policy (...)
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  • Education(Al) Research, Educational Policy-Making and Practice.Charles Clark - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (1):37-57.
    Professor Whitty has endorsed the consensus that research into education is empirical social science, distinguishing ‘educational research’ which seeks directly to influence practice, and ‘education research’ that has substantive value but no necessary practical application.The status of the science here is problematic. The positivist approach is incoherent and so supports neither option. Critical educational science is virtually policy-inert. The interpretive approach is empirically sound but, because of the value component in education, does not support education research either, or account for (...)
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  • Introduction: The Question of Method in Philosophy of Education.Claudia Ruitenberg - 2009 - Philosophy of Education 43 (3):315-323.
    It is possible to raise and solve philosophical problems with no very clear idea of what philosophy is, what it is trying to do, and how it can best do it; but no great progress can be made until these questions have been asked and some answer to them given.
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  • Introduction: The Question of Method in Philosophy of Education.Claudia Ruitenberg - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (3):315-323.
    It is possible to raise and solve philosophical problems with no very clear idea of what philosophy is, what it is trying to do, and how it can best do it; but no great progress can be made until these questions have been asked and some answer to them given ( Collingwood, 2005 , p. 1).
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  • Proteus Rising: Re-Imagining Educational Research.Richard Smith - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (s1):183-198.
    The idea that educational research should be 'scientific', and ideally based on randomised control trials, is in danger of becoming hegemonic. In the face of this it seems important to ask what other kinds of educational research can be respectable in their own different terms. We might also note that the demand for research to be 'scientific' is characteristically modernist, and thus arguably local and temporary. It is then tempting to consider what non-modernist approaches might look like. The purpose of (...)
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  • From Technologization to Totalization in Education Research: US Graduate Training, Methodology, and Critique.Lynda Stone - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (4):527–545.
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  • From Technologization to Totalization in Education Research: US Graduate Training, Methodology, and Critique.Lynda Stone - 2006 - Philosophy of Education 40 (4):527-545.
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  • Between the Lines: Philosophy, Text and Conversation.Richard Smith - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (3):437-449.
    In doing philosophy we need to be aware of the awkwardness of thinking in terms of having a method, still more any kind of 'methodology'. Instead we might consider the different ways in which philosophy has been conceived in terms of contrasts: for example between the written and the spoken word, between exposition and dialogue, and between—in Richard Rorty's terms—systematic and edifying philosophy. This article offers no easy answer to how to proceed, suggesting rather that those who attempt philosophy need (...)
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