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Deleuze on Leibniz : Difference, Continuity, and the Calculus

In Current Continental Theory and Modern Philosophy. Northwestern University Press (2005)

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  1. What Were You Thinking? A Deleuzian/Guattarian Analysis of Communication in the Mathematics Classroom.Elizabeth De Freitas - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (3):287-300.
    The primary aim of this article is to bring the work of Deleuze and Guattari to bear on the question ofcommunication in the classroom. I focus on the mathematics classroom, where agency and subjectivity are highly regulated by the rituals of the discipline, and where neoliberal psychological frameworks continue to dominate theories of teaching and learning. Moreover, the nature ofcommunication in mathematics classrooms remains highlyelusive and problematic, due in part to the distinct relationship the discipline has with verbal language and (...)
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  • Five Figures of Folding: Deleuze on Leibniz's Monadological Metaphysics.Mogens Lærke - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (6):1192-1213.
    This article is about Gilles Deleuze's book Le Pli. Leibniz et le Baroque from 1988. It shows how Deleuze's notion of folding captures some basic intuitions in Leibniz and how they relate to each other. To this purpose, I propose five figures, all referring to the same basic fold, all illustrating how the consideration of such figures allows developing central elements of Leibniz's monadology. These figures can help, I hope, alleviate some of the fundamental difficulties in understanding Deleuze's approach to (...)
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  • The Mathematical Event: Mapping the Axiomatic and the Problematic in School Mathematics. [REVIEW]Elizabeth de Freitas - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (6):581-599.
    Traditional philosophy of mathematics has been concerned with the nature of mathematical objects rather than events. This traditional focus on reified objects is reflected in dominant theories of learning mathematics whereby the learner is meant to acquire familiarity with ideal mathematical objects, such as number, polygon, or tangent. I argue that the concept of event—rather than object—better captures the vitality of mathematics, and offers new ways of thinking about mathematics education. In this paper I draw on two different but related (...)
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  • Ghosts in the Curriculum—Reframing Concepts as Multiplicities.Mark Hardman - 2019 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 53 (2):273-292.
    Journal of Philosophy of Education, EarlyView.
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