Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Problems with John Earman's attempt to reconcile theism with general relativity.Quentin Smith - 2000 - Erkenntnis 52 (1):1-27.
    Discussions of the intersection of general relativity and thephilosophy of religion rarely take place on the technical levelthat involves the details of the mathematical physics of generalrelativity. John Earman's discussion of theism and generalrelativity in his recent book on spacetime singularities is anexception to this tendency. By virtue of his technical expertise,Earman is able to introduce novel arguments into the debatebetween theists and atheists. In this paper, I state and examineEarman's arguments that it is rationally acceptable to believethat theism and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Richard Swinburne, the existence of God, and principle P.Jeremy Gwiazda - 2009 - Sophia 48 (4):393-398.
    Swinburne relies on principle P in The Existence of God to argue that God is simple and thus likely to exist. In this paper, I argue that Swinburne does not support P. In particular, his arguments from mathematical simplicity and scientists’ preferences both fail. Given the central role P plays in Swinburne’s overall argument in The Existence of God , I conclude that Swinburne should further support P if his argument that God likely exists is to be persuasive.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • A new critique of theological interpretations of physical cosmology.A. Grünbaum - 2000 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (1):1-43.
    This paper is a sequel to my 'Theological Misinterpretations of Current Physical Cosmology' (Foundations of Physics [1996], 26 (4); revised in Philo [1998], 1 (1)). There I argued that the Big Bang models of (classical) general relativity theory, as well as the original 1948 versions of the steady state cosmology, are each logically incompatible with the time-honored theological doctrine that perpetual divine creation ('creatio continuans') is required in each of these two theorized worlds. Furthermore, I challenged the perennial theological doctrine (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations