Switch to: References

Citations of:

Kant and Sexual Perversion

The Monist 86 (1):55-89 (2003)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Crimina Carnis and Morally Obligatory Suicide.D. R. Cooley - 2006 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (3):327-356.
    The common consensus on suicide seems to be that even if taking one's life is permissible on some basis, it cannot be morally obligatory. In fact, one argument often used against Utilitarianism is that the principle sometimes requires individuals to sacrifice themselves for the benefit of others, as in the case of healthy individuals who can donate all their life saving organs to those in need of transplants. However, a plausible philosophical case can be built for morally obligatory suicide. First, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Sexual Desire and the Importance of Marriage in Kant's Philosophy of Law.Thomas Mertens - 2014 - Ratio Juris 27 (3):330-343.
    In his moral writings, Kant states that moral duty cannot be derived from “the special characteristics of human nature.” This statement is untenable if one takes seriously Kant 's moral views on sexual desire. Instead close study reveals that considerations based on both morality and nature play a role here. The combination of these two elements leads to inconsistencies and difficulties in Kant 's understanding of sexual desire, but they enable us to better understand the importance Kant attributes to marriage (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Kant-Bibliographie 2003.Margit Ruffing - 2005 - Kant-Studien 96 (4):468-501.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Dimensions of Naturalness.Helena Siipi - 2008 - Ethics and the Environment 13 (1):pp. 71-103.
    This paper presents a way of classifying different forms of naturalness and unnaturalness. Three main forms of (un)naturalness are found as the following: history- based (un)naturalness, property-based (un)naturalness and relation-based (un)naturalness. Numerous subforms (and some subforms of the subforms) of each are presented. The subforms differ with respect to the entities that are found (un)natural, with respect to their all-inclusiveness, and whether (un)naturalness is seen as all-or-nothing affair, or a continuous gradient. This kind of conceptual analysis is needed, first, because (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations