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  1. Representationalism and Power: The Individual Subject and Distributed Cognition in the Field of Educational Technology.David Shutkin - 2019 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 38 (5):481-498.
    Distributed cognition, as it considers how technologies augment cognition, informs technology integration in education. Most educational technologists interested in distributed cognition embrace a representational theory of mind. As this theory assumes cognition occurs in the brain and depends on the internal representation of external information, it is informed by a mind/body dualism that separates the individual student from material things. Alternatively, the theory of the extended mind describes the mind as a dynamic system of interactions inclusive of human agents, technologies (...)
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  • Modes of Participation.Joao Pina-Cabral - forthcoming - Anthropological Theory.
    This paper focuses on the notion of ‘participation’ as it has been used in the social sciences throughout the twentieth century. It proposes that there are two main traditions of use—a ‘poorer’ and a ‘richer’ one—and it argues in favour of the second. It does this by examining how Simmel and Goffman, on the one hand, and Lévy-Bruhl and Durkheim, on the other, defined participation. Developed by Lucien Lévy-Bruhl in the first part of last century, ‘participation’ in the richer sense (...)
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  • Sense of Place, Fast and Slow: The Potential Contributions of Affordance Theory to Sense of Place.Christopher M. Raymond, Marketta Kyttä & Richard Stedman - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • The Work Process Setting and Situational Contexts Based on Socially Distributed Cognition: An Interactive, Cognitive and Social Proposal of Analysis.Oriol Barranco, Carlos Lozares & Sara Moreno - 2017 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 47 (4):481-501.
    To carry out an ethnographic study on the work process in the sterilization unit of a hospital in Catalonia, we found the socially distributed cognition approaches of Hutchins and Kirsh useful. However, these approaches lack sufficient explanation on three important issues: the pragmatic criteria for identifying and delimiting a relevant unit of analysis and therefore the setting and contexts of the work process; the mechanisms and results of reciprocal influences between these levels of analysis; and the relation between these levels. (...)
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  • Embodiment and the Construction of Social Knowledge: Towards an Integration of Embodiment and Social Representations Theory.Cliodhna O'Connor - 2017 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 47 (1):2-24.
    Recent developments in the psychological and social sciences have seen a surge of attention to concepts of embodiment. The burgeoning field of embodied cognition, as well as the long-standing tradition of phenomenological philosophy, offer valuable insights for theorising how people come to understand the world around them. However, the implications of human embodiment have been largely neglected by one of the key frameworks for conceptualising the development of social knowledge: Social Representations Theory. This article seeks to spark a dialogue between (...)
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  • Toward Defining the Causal Role of Consciousness: Using Models of Memory and Moral Judgment From Cognitive Neuroscience to Expand the Sociological Dual‐Process Model.Luis Antonio Vila‐Henninger - 2015 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 45 (2):238-260.
    What role does “discursive consciousness” play in decision-making? How does it interact with “practical consciousness?” These two questions constitute two important gaps in strong practice theory that extend from Pierre Bourdieu's habitus to Stephen Vaisey's sociological dual-process model and beyond. The goal of this paper is to provide an empirical framework that expands the sociological dual-process model in order to fill these gaps using models from cognitive neuroscience. In particular, I use models of memory and moral judgment that highlight the (...)
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