Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Are the Kids Alright? Rawls, Adoption, and Gay Parents.Ryan Reed - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (5):969-982.
    Scholars have extensively debated the family’s place within liberalism, generally, and specific attention and critique has been given to the family in Rawls’ work. What has received less focus are the requirements of parents in a Rawlsian polity and, further, what those requirements might imply for the one case where states explicitly regulate the process of becoming parents: adoption. This paper seeks to discover what might be required of parents, adoptive or otherwise, in a Rawlsian social contract state. Second, it (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Vereinbarkeit zwischen Erwerbsarbeit und Familienleben: Eine Frage der Gerechtigkeit.Sabine Hohl - 2015 - Zeitschrift Für Praktische Philosophie 2 (2):311-338.
    In diesem Beitrag argumentiere ich, dass die Ermöglichung von Vereinbarkeit zwischen Erwerbsarbeit und Familienleben ein Erfordernis der Gerechtigkeit bildet. Eltern besitzen einen Anspruch auf Vereinbarkeit, der auf zwei Interessen gründet: Dem Interesse am Zugang zur Erwerbstätigkeit und dem Interesse an der Pflege der Eltern-Kind-Beziehung, durch die besondere Güter realisiert werden. Eine staatliche Politik der Vereinbarkeit lässt sich auch gegenüber denjenigen Gruppen rechtfertigen, die kein besonderes Interesse daran haben – gegenüber Erwachsenen, die keine Kinder haben, und gegenüber Eltern, die ein ‚Ernährermodell‘ (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Parenthood and Procreation.Tim Bayne & Avery Kolers - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Children as Negative Externalities?Serena Olsaretti - 2017 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 16 (2):152-173.
    Egalitarian theories assume, without defending it, the view that the costs of children should be shared between non-parents and parents. This standard position is called into question by the Parental Provision view. Drawing on the familiar idea that people should be held responsible for the consequences of their choices, the Parental Provision view holds that under certain conditions egalitarian justice requires parents to pay for the full costs of their children, as it would be unfair for non-parents to bear the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations