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  1. The Ethical Stance of the “Qiwulun ”.Massimiliano Lacertosa - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-14.
    This essay analyses the second chapter of the Zhuangzi 莊子, the “Qiwulun 齊物論.” After a brief examination of its main ideas, it will be argued that the “Qiwulun” needs to be considered not as an equalization that makes everything indistinguishable but as a discourse on corresponding things. A more attentive analysis of this correspondence among the myriad things will lead to the consideration of their mutual transformation. The conclusion is that, contrary to the ontotheological nature of Western metaphysics that imposes (...)
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  • The Happy Slave Isn't Free: Relational Autonomy and Freedom in the Zhuangzi.Mercedes Valmisa - 2019 - Philosophy Compass 14 (3):e12569.
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  • The Emotion of Shame and the Virtue of Righteousness in Mencius.Bryan W. Van Norden - 2002 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 2 (1):45-77.
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  • Patient Moral Relativism in the Zhuangzi.Yong Huang - 2018 - Philosophia 46 (4):877-894.
    Moral relativism familiar in the Western philosophical tradition, according to David Lyons, is either agent relativism or appraiser relativism or appraiser group). As Lyons has convincingly argued, they are both problematic. However, in the ancient Chinese Daoist classic, the Zhuangzi, we can find a different type of moral relativism, which I call patient relativism. In the essay, I aim to argue in what sense Zhuangzi is a patient relativist and how patient relativism can avoid the problem of agent relativism and (...)
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  • Style, Substance, and Philosophical Methodology: A Cross-Cultural Case Study.Julianne Chung - 2018 - Dialogue 57 (2):217-250.
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  • Principles, Virtues, or Detachment? Some Appreciative Reflections on Karen Stohr’s On Manners.Bryan Van Norden - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (2):227-239.
    Karen Stohr’s book On Manners argues persuasively that rules of etiquette, though conventional, play an essential moral role, because they “serve as vehicles through which we express important moral values like respect and consideration for the needs, ideas, and opinions of others”. Stohr frequently invokes Kantian concepts and principles in order to make her point. In Part 2 of this essay, I shall argue that the significance of etiquette is better understood using a virtue ethics framework, like that of Confucianism, (...)
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  • Zhuangzi’s Ironic Detachment and Political Commitment.Bryan Van Norden - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (1):1-17.
    Paul Gewirtz has suggested that contemporary Chinese society lacks a shared framework. A Rortian might describe this by saying that China lacks a “final vocabulary” of “thick terms” with which to resolve ethical disagreements. I briefly examine the strengths and weaknesses of Confucianism and Legalism as potential sources of such a final vocabulary, but most of this essay focuses on Zhuangzian Daoism. Zhuangzi 莊子 provides many stories and metaphors that can inspire advocates of political pluralism. However, I suggest that Zhuangzi (...)
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  • Zhuangzi the Poet: Re-Reading the Peng Bird Image.Lian Xinda - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (3):233-254.
    The image of the Peng bird, which opens the Zhuangzi text, is not the product of metaphysical reasoning. An inspiring example of soaring up and going beyond, the image is used to broaden the outlook of the small mind; its function is thus more therapeutic than instructional. With its rich poetic and experiential content, the image of the Peng refuses to be reduced to an abstract concept, or a mere signifier of certain philosophical position. Misreading of the image results from (...)
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  • The Zhuangzi and You 遊: Defining an Ideal Without Contradiction.Alan Levinovitz - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (4):479-496.
    You 遊 is a crucial term for understanding the Zhuangzi . Translated as “play,” “free play,” and “wandering,” it is usually defined as an ideal, playful Zhuangzian way of being. There are two problems with this definition. The first is logical: the Zhuangzi cannot consistently recommend playfulness as an ideal, since doing so vitiates the essence of you —it becomes an ethical imperative instead of an activity freely undertaken for its own sake. The second problem is performative: arguments for playful (...)
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  • Perspectivism as a Way of Knowing in the Zhuangzi.Tim Connolly - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (4):487-505.
    A perspectivist theory is usually taken to mean that (1) our knowledge of the world is inevitably shaped by our particular perspectives, (2) any one of these perspectives is as good as any other, and (3) any claims to objective or authoritative knowledge are consequently without ground. Recent scholarship on Nietzsche, however, has challenged the prevalent view that the philosopher holds (2) and (3), arguing instead that his perspectivism aims at attaining a greater level of objectivity. In this essay, I (...)
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  • The Emotion of Shame and the Virtue of Righteousness in Mencius.Bryan Van Norden - 2002 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 2 (1):45-77.
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