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  1. Illness, Injury, and the Phenomenology of Loss: A Dialogue.Jonathan Cole & Matthew Ratcliffe - 2022 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 29 (9-10):150-174.
    This paper explores similarities and differences between grief over the death of a person and other experiences of loss that are sometimes termed 'grief', focusing on the impact of serious illness and bodily injury. It takes the form of a dialogue between a physician/ neurophysiologist and a philosopher. Adopting a broad conception of grief, we suggest that experiences of lost or unrealized possibilities are central to all forms of grief. However, these unfold in different ways over prolonged periods. Experiences of (...)
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  • Temporal Perspectives and the Phenomenology of Grief.Jack Shardlow - forthcoming - Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-22.
    In first personal accounts of the experience of grief, it is often described as disrupting the experience of time. This aspect of the experience has gained more attention in recent discussions, but it may nonetheless strike some as puzzling. Grieving subjects do, after all, still perceptually experience motion, change, and succession, and they are typically capable of orienting themselves in time and accurately estimating durations. As such, it is not immediately obvious how we ought understand the claim that grief disrupts (...)
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  • Grief and the non-death losses of Covid-19.Louise Richardson & Becky Millar - 2023 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 22 (5):1087-1103.
    Articles in the popular media and testimonies collected in empirical work suggest that many people who have not been bereaved have nevertheless grieved over pandemic-related losses of various kinds. There is a philosophical question about whether any experience of a non-death loss ought to count as grief, hinging upon how the object of grief is construed. However, even if one accepts that certain significant non-death losses are possible targets of grief, many reported cases of putative pandemic-related grief may appear less (...)
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  • Mourning a death foretold: memory and mental time travel in anticipatory grief.Christopher Jude McCarroll & Karen Yan - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-19.
    Grief is a complex emotional experience or process, which is typically felt in response to the death of a loved one, most typically a family member, child, or partner. Yet the way in which grief manifests is much more complex than this. The things we grieve over are multiple and diverse. We may grieve for a former partner after the breakup of a relationship; parents sometimes report experiencing grief when their grown-up children leave the family home. We can also experience (...)
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  • Vicarious Grief, Mental Health, and the Duty to Grieve.C. Garland - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy of Emotion 4 (1):6-12.
    In Grief: A Philosophical Guide, Michael Cholbi presents a compelling account of the nature of grief. To further illustrate how fruitful the philosophical study of grief, and Cholbi’s account of it is, I present three sets of comments. The first regards the extent to which Cholbi’s account of grief also provides an account of vicarious grief. The second concerns the paradox of grief and the good of grief, and suggests one reason we may recommend grief is that grieving is healthy. (...)
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