Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Grounding Ethical Mindfulness for/in Nature: Trees in Their Places.Paul Cloke & Owain Jones - 2003 - Ethics, Place and Environment 6 (3):195 – 213.
    In this paper we examine attempts to reframe the ethics of nature-society relations. We trace a postmodern turn which reflects a distrust of overarching moral codes and narratives and points towards a more nuanced understanding of how personal moral impulses are embedded within, and inter-subjectively constituted by, contextual configurations of self and other. We also trace an ethical turn which reflects a critique of anthropocentrism and points towards moves to non-anthropocentric frames in which the othernesses and ethics of difference are (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Animals in the Midst of Cities.Nathalie Blanc - 2020 - Biosemiotics 13 (3):411-429.
    Our hypothesis is that ecological transformation involves socio-environmental communities formed through joint action on a material environment, which can be set as a conjonction of practices between senses and meanings — giving birth to landscapes, life environments and matter of all kinds — analyzed in the context of solidarities — as well as conflicts of territoriality, in which human collectives associate with living matter and the environment to fight against other uses of space or to implement new ways of seeing (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • More Than a Furry Companion: The Ripple Effect of Companion Animals on Neighborhood Interactions and Sense of Community.Lisa Wood, Darcy Bosch, Max Bulsara & Billie Giles-Corti - 2007 - Society and Animals 15 (1):43-56.
    Companion animals exemplify the affinities possible between humans and nonhuman animals. Evidence documenting a diversity of emotional, physical, and therapeutic benefits of pet guardianship substantiates sentimental anecdotes from pet owners. Although the literature focuses primarily on the "one to one" benefits accruing from interactions with pets, this paper explores the potential role of pets as facilitators of social interactions and sense of community. The paper uses triangulation to synthesize findings from qualitative and quantitative research undertaken in three Western Australian suburbs. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Tracking the Human–Wildlife–Conservation Nexus Across the Human–Animal Studies (HAS) Landscape.Monica Ogra & Julie Urbanik - 2018 - Society and Animals 26 (2):1-8.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Animals, Colonisation and Urbanisation.Clare Palmer - 2003 - Philosophy and Geography 6 (1):47-58.
    Urbanization and development of green spaces is continuing worldwide. Such development frequently engulfs the habitats of native animals, with a variety of effects on their existence, location and ways of living. This paper attempts to theorize about some of these effects, drawing on aspects of Foucault's discussions of power and using a metaphor of human colonization, where colonization is understood as an "ongoing process of dispossession, negotiation, transformation, and resistance." It argues that a variety of different kinds of human/animal power (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • A Place for the Animal Dead: Pets, Pet Cemeteries and Animal Ethics in Late Victorian Britain.Philip Howell - 2002 - Ethics, Place and Environment 5 (1):5 – 22.
    The recent 'animal turn' in geography has contributed to a critical examination of the inseparable geographies of human and non-human animals, and has a clear ethical dimension. This paper is intended to explore these same ethical issues through a consideration of the historical geography of petkeeping as this relates to the death and commemoration of favourite household animals. The emergence of the pet cemetery, towards the end of the 19th century, is a significant step in itself, but this was only (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Colonization, Urbanization, and Animals.Clare Palmer - 2003 - Philosophy and Geography 6 (1):47 – 58.
    Urbanization and development of green spaces is continuing worldwide. Such development frequently engulfs the habitats of native animals, with a variety of effects on their existence, location and ways of living. This paper attempts to theorize about some of these effects, drawing on aspects of Foucault's discussions of power and using a metaphor of human colonization, where colonization is understood as an "ongoing process of dispossession, negotiation, transformation, and resistance." It argues that a variety of different kinds of human/animal power (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Placing the Wild in the City: "Thinking with" Melbourne's Bats.Melanie Thomson - 2007 - Society and Animals 15 (1):79-95.
    This paper uses academic and lay discourses to examine the ways in which "the city" is constructed in its relationship to "wildlife." The paper examines the negative and essentialized ways in which the city's relationship to wildlife has been represented in postcolonial theory and animal geography. The paper further explores these theoretical framings of the city in the empirical context of the relocation of an urban, flying fox colony, which provides opportunities to reconsider these bounded conceptualizations of the city.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Catching the Rat: Understanding Multiple and Contradictory Human-Rat Relations as Situated Practices.Koen Beumer - 2014 - Society and Animals 22 (1):8-25.
    Humans and rats relate to each other in a variety of ways. Consider the different ways that humans relate to rats in the sewer, the laboratory, and the living room: depending on the location of the encounter, human-rat relations can be characterized as hostile, instrumental, or friendly. Rather than searching for a single human-animal relation, this article suggests that the multiple and contradictory relations between humans and nonhuman animals deserve an explanation. The article argues that the multiplicity of human-animal relations (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Guest Editors’ Introduction.Traci Warkentin & Gavan P. L. Watson - 2014 - Society and Animals 22 (1):1-7.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation