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  1. Globalized Parochialism: Consequences of English as Lingua Franca in Philosophy of Science.Gereon Wolters - 2015 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 29 (2):189-200.
    In recent decades, English has become the uncontestable lingua franca of philosophy of science and of most other areas of philosophy and of the humanities. To have a lingua franca produces enormous benefits for the entire scientific community. The price for those benefits, however, is paid almost exclusively by non-native speakers of English. Section 1 identifies three asymmetries that individual NoNES researchers encounter: ‘publication asymmetry’, ‘resources asymmetry’, and ‘team asymmetry’. Section 2 deals with ‘globalized parochialism asymmetry’: thanks to English being (...)
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  • Is There a Cultural Barrier Between Historical Epistemology and Analytic Philosophy of Science?Anastasios Brenner - 2015 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 29 (2):201-214.
    One of the difficulties facing the philosopher of science today is the divide between historical epistemology and analytic philosophy of science. For over half a century these two traditions have followed independent and divergent paths. Historical epistemology, which originated in France in the early twentieth century, has recently been reformulated by a number of scholars such as Lorraine Daston, Ian Hacking, and Hans-Jörg Rheinberger. Elaborating novel historical methods, they seek to provide answers to major questions in the field. In the (...)
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