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  1. Pro Mundo Mori? The Problem of Cosmopolitan Motivation in War.Lior Erez - 2017 - Ethics and International Affairs 31 (2):143-165.
    This article presents a new understanding of the problem of cosmopolitan motivation in war, comparing it to the motivational critique of social justice cosmopolitanism. The problem of cosmopolitanism’s “motivational gap” is best interpreted as a political one, not a meta-ethical or ethical one. That is, the salient issue is not whether an individual soldier is able to be motivated by cosmopolitan concerns, nor is it whether being motivated by cosmopolitanism would be too demanding. Rather, given considerations of legitimacy in the (...)
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  • Amphetamines, Cognitive Enhancement and Their Implications for Medical Military Ethics.Arthur Saniotis & Jaliya Kumaratilake - 2020 - Journal of Military Ethics 19 (1):69-75.
    The growing area of military bio-technologies, especially the use of cogniceuticals, raises several ethical concerns for military physicians. These include the role of military physicians in prescr...
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  • Prefrontal Electrical Stimulation in Non-Depressed Reduces Levels of Reported Negative Affects From Daily Stressors.Nick J. Davis - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
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  • Who's to Regret, What's to Regret?Andrew Fenton & Timothy Krahn - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):42 – 43.
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  • Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Use in Warfighting: Benefits, Risks, and Future Prospects.Steven E. Davis & Glen A. Smith - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
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  • Assessing the Importance of Maintaining Soldiers' Moral Responsibility—Possible Trade-Offs.Ori Lev - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):44 – 45.
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  • Regulating Biomedical Enhancements in the Military.Richard Edmund Ashcroft - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):47 – 49.
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  • Military Medical Ethics.Michael L. Gross - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (1):92-109.
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  • Ethical Blowback From Emerging Technologies.Patrick Lin - 2010 - Journal of Military Ethics 9 (4):313-331.
    The military is a major driver of technological, world-changing innovations which, like the Internet, often have unpredictable dual uses and widespread civilian impact (?blowback?). Ethical and policy concerns arising from such technologies, therefore, are not limited to military affairs, but can have great implications for society at large as well. This paper will focus on two technology areas making headlines at present: human enhancement technologies and robotics, representing both biological and technological upgrades to the military. The concerns we will raise (...)
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  • Ethical Use of Cogniceuticals in the Militaries of Democratic Nations.Michael B. Russo, Michael V. Arnett, Maria L. Thomas & John A. Caldwell - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):39 – 41.
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  • Soldiers as Agents.Richard H. Dees - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):46 – 47.
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